Skip navigation

Elephants, donuts and hamburgers: young children co-operating to co-operate and co-operating to compete in two primary schools

Elephants, donuts and hamburgers: young children co-operating to co-operate and co-operating to compete in two primary schools

Maras, Pamela F., Lewis, A. and Simonds, Laura M. (1999) Elephants, donuts and hamburgers: young children co-operating to co-operate and co-operating to compete in two primary schools. Educational Psychology, 19 (3). pp. 245-258. ISSN 0144-3410 (doi:10.1080/0144341990190301)

Full text not available from this repository.

Abstract

A total of 152 5-6-year-old schoolchildren worked alone or in groups, cooperatively within groups or competing against another group, over 4 weeks. New measures allowed us to consider their preferences for collective or individualistic styles. Three factors: individualism/collectivism, sociability and altruism were identified. The first two were found to be stable over time; the third changed and was related to whether the children worked co-operatively or competitively. Differences were found in collectivism/individualism. Girls
(particularly older girls) preferred working co-peratively significantly more than boys at Time 1; however, this decreased over time for girls, whilst boys became less individualistic over time. Younger children scored significantly less than older children on a sociability factor, but this increased significantly over time compared to the older children—artificially in the group
co-operative condition. Findings are discussed in light of curriculum and pedagogy of primary schools and social psychological research with children.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: working co-operatively, individualistic, primary school, individualism/collectivism, sociability, altruism
Subjects: L Education > LC Special aspects of education
L Education > LB Theory and practice of education > LB1501 Primary Education
L Education > L Education (General)
Pre-2014 Departments: School of Health & Social Care > Department of Psychology & Counselling
School of Health & Social Care
Related URLs:
Last Modified: 14 Oct 2016 09:09
Selected for GREAT 2016: None
Selected for GREAT 2017: None
Selected for GREAT 2018: None
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/3428

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item