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Sociology and Human Ecology: Complexity and Posthumanist Perspectives

Sociology and Human Ecology: Complexity and Posthumanist Perspectives

Smith, John A. and Jenks, Chris (2017) Sociology and Human Ecology: Complexity and Posthumanist Perspectives. Complexity in The Social Sciences . Routledge, Abingdon. ISBN 9781138230095 (In Press)

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Abstract

This book proposal represents the first title in the proposed Complexity in Social Science series at Routledge. In common with the series this book begins with the current crisis or declining credibility of post-structuralism and human-centred analyses as sufficient to address the complexities of the human ecological relationship to the terrestrial environment and the biosphere. Further, this need to address ecological processes and emergent phenomena is dispersed through many disciplines that can inform the social sciences. Our previous book Qualitative Complexity is seen by contributors to this field as a key text addressing that interdisciplinary need. The new proposal seeks to develop that groundwork by proposing a much more developed synthesis with biosemiotics and a more fundamental eco-ontology, including ecological economics in the broadest sense. It is therefore offering a much broader base of an essential ground for study and inter-disciplinary engagement. We do not attempt to specify or delimit that ground but rather to open the door, in some detail, to foundational and unavoidable issues such as the need for an ontology consistent with the physical sciences and an epistemology that recognises the relation of human cognition to the biosphere. In this sense we share and underline the ambition of the series to make a major critical change to the possibility, status and range of the social sciences. Part of this rationale will be the adoption of ‘fuzzy’ logic perspectives throughout the text.

Item Type: Book
Uncontrolled Keywords: Auto-eco-organisation, Auto-exo-reference, Systems far from equilibrium, Path depndency, Next adjacent possible
Subjects: G Geography. Anthropology. Recreation > GF Human ecology. Anthropogeography
H Social Sciences > H Social Sciences (General)
Faculty / Department / Research Group: Faculty of Education & Health
Faculty of Education & Health > Department of Education & Community Studies
Faculty of Education & Health > Education Research Group
Last Modified: 10 Jul 2017 10:46
Selected for GREAT 2016: None
Selected for GREAT 2017: GREAT a
Selected for GREAT 2018: None
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/16849

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