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The political dichotomy of school leadership: policy, practice, social justice - evidence from sixteen countries

The political dichotomy of school leadership: policy, practice, social justice - evidence from sixteen countries

Miller, Paul (2019) The political dichotomy of school leadership: policy, practice, social justice - evidence from sixteen countries. Research in Educational Administration and Leadership (REAL). ISSN 2564-7261 (Online) (In Press)

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Abstract

Globally, schools continue to face ongoing reductions in budgetary allocations, increase in student numbers, performativity pressures and high stake accountability. Like it or not, schools/ school leaders are operating in rapidly changing national educational policy contexts that are demanding more from less and a much greater contribution to national economic development – leader some commentators and school leaders alike to suggest that schools are being reoriented towards national economic development and less towards social transformation, a fundamental aim of education as set out in the United Nations convention on the Rights of the Child (UNCRC). This dichotomy is the site for several tensions occasioned by the approach to educational policy making, and the policy apparatus of national governments, played out in schools, where school leaders are caught between implementing government policy, delivering an education to students that equips them to reap the espoused benefits of education, and keeping staff engaged and motivated. How do school leaders lead for social justice in contexts where educational policy appear out of sync with social justice? How do school leaders lead in contexts where the good of the national ‘community’ appear to supersede the good of local communities and individuals? This paper examines the dichotomy of school leadership, brought about and sustained by national political actions which, although professing a ‘futures’ orientation, appears to be in conflict with quality school leadership and outcomes consistent with social justice.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: school leaders, leadership, social justice, educational policy, dichotomy, education
Subjects: L Education > L Education (General)
Faculty / Department / Research Group: Faculty of Education, Health & Human Sciences
Related URLs:
Last Modified: 06 Dec 2019 10:25
Selected for GREAT 2016: None
Selected for GREAT 2017: None
Selected for GREAT 2018: None
Selected for GREAT 2019: None
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/26283

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