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Addressing nutritional problems in resource-poor community settings using food-based local solutions: applying the food multimix (FMM) concept

Addressing nutritional problems in resource-poor community settings using food-based local solutions: applying the food multimix (FMM) concept

Amuna, Paul (2010) Addressing nutritional problems in resource-poor community settings using food-based local solutions: applying the food multimix (FMM) concept. In: The 4th Africa Nutritional Epidemiology Conference (ANEC IV), 4 - 8 Oct 2010, Nairobi, Kenya. (Unpublished)

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Abstract

Background: Chronic hunger and nutritional inadequacy remain major obstacles to human development and the first UN Millennium Development Goal (MDGs) is targeted at reducing chronic hunger in particular. Various attempts have been made to address the issue including through food aid, supplementation and fortification programmes.
Objective: The primary focus of this paper is to demonstrate how local traditional food sources can be harnessed to help reduce hunger and meet daily nutritional needs of vulnerable groups in resource-poor settings at low cost employing the food multimix concept.
Methods: The FMM concept is based on the principle that combining indigenous knowledge, understanding of human physiological needs across the life cycle and employing the principles of food science and technology, scant traditional local food ingredients can be combined to produce nutritionally balanced recipes and composite diets using the ‘nutrient strengths’ of each ingredient. In this study, candidate foods were identified and selected to complement each other. Traditional food processing methods were employed including roasting, sun and freeze-drying and blending. Recipe development was followed by proximate and micronutrient analyses including the use of AAS and ICP / ICP-MS for trace mineral analysis. Through a process of optimization, recipes were refined to meet specifically targeted nutrient needs.
Results: Applying the FMM concept resulted in production of composite recipes of very low cost (range 0.1 – 0.16 USD per 100 g of product). Energy density ranged from 350 - 400 kcals and protein from 12 – 20 g per 100 g respectively. Mineral content as a % of RDIs ranged from 40 – 100 % and vitamins from 50 – 300 % respectively, depending on age and additional metabolic requirements.
Conclusions: We have demonstrated that it is possible to meet energy and nutrient needs in poor communities through harnessing their own local food resources and suggest that these traditional approaches should be given serious consideration in poverty and hunger-reduction programmes.

Item Type: Conference or Conference Paper (Keynote)
Uncontrolled Keywords: chronic hunger, FMM, candidate foods, nutrient strengths, vulnerable groups, resource-poor communities
Subjects: R Medicine > RA Public aspects of medicine > RA0421 Public health. Hygiene. Preventive Medicine
Faculty / Department / Research Group: Faculty of Engineering & Science > Department of Life & Sports Sciences
Related URLs:
Last Modified: 05 Dec 2016 12:16
Selected for GREAT 2016: None
Selected for GREAT 2017: None
Selected for GREAT 2018: None
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/5374

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