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Yams (Dioscorea spp.) from the South Pacific Islands contain many novel badnaviruses: Implications for international movement of yam germplasm

Yams (Dioscorea spp.) from the South Pacific Islands contain many novel badnaviruses: Implications for international movement of yam germplasm

Kenyon, Lawrence, Lebas, B.S.M. and Seal, S.E. (2008) Yams (Dioscorea spp.) from the South Pacific Islands contain many novel badnaviruses: Implications for international movement of yam germplasm. Archives of Virology, 153 (5). pp. 877-889. ISSN 0304-8608 (Print), 1432-8798 (Online) (doi:10.1007/s00705-008-0062-5)

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Abstract

Yam (Dioscorea spp.) samples (n = 690) from seven South Pacific Islands were screened for badnavirus infection by ELISA using two antisera to African badnaviruses. Positive readings were obtained for 26.4–34.6% of samples representing both known (D. bulbifera, D. nummularia and D. pentaphylla) and unreported host species (D. alata, D. esculenta, D. rotundata and D. trifida) in this region. Total DNAs were extracted from 25 ELISA-positive plants and 4 ELISA-negative controls and subjected to PCR amplification with badnavirus-specific primers targeting the reverse transcriptase (RT)–RNaseH genes. All 29 samples yielded the expected size PCR-product for badnaviruses, which were cloned and sequenced. Phylogenetic analyses of the resulting 45 partial (500–527 bp) RT–RNaseH sequences revealed 11 new sequence groups with <79% nucleotide identity to each other or any EMBL sequence. Three sequences (two groups) were highly divergent to the other nine new South Pacific yam badnavirus groups (47.9–57.2% identity) and probably represent either new Caulimoviridae genera or endogenous pararetrovirus sequences. Some sequence groups appeared specific to particular Dioscorea host species. Four 99.9% identical RT–RNaseH sequences possessing nine amino acid deletions from D. esculenta from three islands represent a putative integrated sequence group. The distribution of sequence groups across the islands indicates that badnaviruses have spread extensively between islands and continents through infected germplasm.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: [1] Published online: 11 March 2008. [2] Published in print: 1 May 2008. [3] Published as: Archives of Virology, (2008), Vol. 153, (5), pp. 877-889.
Uncontrolled Keywords: tungro-bacilliform virus, yellow mottle virus, swollen shoot virus, mosaic-virus, nucleotide-sequence, banana, genome, alata, diversity, rice
Subjects: S Agriculture > S Agriculture (General)
Q Science > QR Microbiology > QR355 Virology
S Agriculture > SB Plant culture
Q Science > QR Microbiology
Faculty / Department / Research Group: Faculty of Engineering & Science > Natural Resources Institute
Faculty of Engineering & Science > Natural Resources Institute > Agriculture, Health & Environment Department
Related URLs:
Last Modified: 11 Sep 2014 16:23
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/2129

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