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Influence of a fed or fasted state on the s-IgA response to prolonged cycling in active men and women

Influence of a fed or fasted state on the s-IgA response to prolonged cycling in active men and women

Allgrove, Judith E., Geneen, Louise, Latif, Sarah and Gleeson, Michael (2009) Influence of a fed or fasted state on the s-IgA response to prolonged cycling in active men and women. International Journal of Sport Nutrition and Exercise Metabolism, 19 (3). pp. 209-221. ISSN 1526-484X

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Abstract

This study investigated the effect of a fed or fasted state on the salivary immunoglobulin A (s-IgA) response to prolonged cycling. Using a randomized, crossover design, 16 active adults (8 men and 8 women) performed 2 hr of cycling on a stationary ergometer at 65% of maximal oxygen uptake on 1 occasion after an overnight fast (FAST) and on another occasion 2 hr after consuming a 2.2-MJ high-carbohydrate meal (FED). Timed, unstimulated whole saliva samples were collected immediately before ingestion of the meal, immediately preexercise, 5 min before cessation of exercise, immediately postexercise, and 1 hr postexercise. The samples were analyzed for s-IgA concentration, osmolality, and cortisol, and saliva flow rates were determined to calculate s-IgA secretion rate. Saliva flow rate decreased by 50% during exercise (p < .05), and s-IgA concentration increased by 42% (p < .05), but s-IgA secretion rate remained unchanged. There was a 37% reduction in s-IgA:osmolality postexercise (p < .05), and salivary cortisol increased by 68% (p < .05). There was no effect of FED vs. FAST on these salivary responses. The s-IgA concentration, secretion rate, and osmolality were found to be significantly lower in women than in men throughout the exercise protocol (p < .05); however, there was no difference between genders in saliva flow rate, s-IgA:osmolality ratio, or cortisol. These data demonstrate that a fed or fasted state 2 hr before exercise does not influence resting s-IgA or the response to prolonged cycling. Furthermore, these results show lower levels of s-IgA and osmolality in women than in men at rest.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: [1] ISSN 1526-484X (Print), 1543-2742 (Online).
Uncontrolled Keywords: salivary immunoglobulin A, s-IgA, cycling, exercise, nutritional status, salivary flow rate
Subjects: R Medicine > RC Internal medicine > RC1200 Sports Medicine
Faculty / Department / Research Group: Faculty of Engineering & Science > Department of Life & Sports Sciences
Related URLs:
Last Modified: 05 Dec 2016 14:10
Selected for GREAT 2016: None
Selected for GREAT 2017: None
Selected for GREAT 2018: None
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/1937

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