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Effect of caffeine ingestion during prolonged exhaustive exercise on salivary immunoglobulin A, alpha-amylase and cortisol

Effect of caffeine ingestion during prolonged exhaustive exercise on salivary immunoglobulin A, alpha-amylase and cortisol

Allgrove, Judith, Oliveira, M., Silver, B. and Gleeson, Michael (2009) Effect of caffeine ingestion during prolonged exhaustive exercise on salivary immunoglobulin A, alpha-amylase and cortisol. In: Loland, S., Bo, K., Fasting, K., Hallen, J., Ommundsen, Y., Roberts, G. and Tsolakidis, E., (eds.) Book of Abstracts of the 14th Annual Congress of the European College of Sport Science, Oslo/Norway, June 24-27, 2009. European College of Sport Science, Cologne, p. 503. ISBN 9788250204201

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Abstract

Exercise can have deleterious effects on the secretion of salivary immunoglobulin A (s-IgA), which appears to be related to perturbations in sympatheticoadrenal activation (Teeuw et al., 2004). Caffeine, commonly used for its ergogenic properties is associated with increased sympathetic nervous system activity, and it has been previously shown that caffeine ingestion before intensive cycling enhances s-IgA responses during exercise (Bishop et al., 2006). Therefore, the aim of the present study was to examine the effect of a performance cereal bar, containing caffeine, before and during prolonged exhaustive cycling on exercise performance and the salivary secretion of IgA, alpha-amylase activity and cortisol. Using a randomised cross-over design and following a 10 – 12 hour overnight fast, 12 trained cyclists, mean (SEM) age: 21(1) yr; height: 179(2) cm; body mass: 73.6(2.5) kg; maximal oxygen uptake, VO2max: 57.9(1.2) completed 2.5 h of cycling at 60%VO2max (with regular water ingestion) on a stationary ergometer, which was followed by a ride to exhaustion at 75% VO2max. Immediately before exercise, and after 55 min and 115 min of exercise participants ingested a 0.9 MJ cereal bar containing 45 g carbohydrate, 5 g protein, 3 g fat and 100 mg of caffeine (CAF) or an isocaloric noncaffeine bar (PLA). Unstimulated timed saliva samples were collected immediately before exercise, after 70 min and 130 min of exercise, and immediately after the exhaustive exercise bout. Saliva was analysed for s-IgA, alpha-amylase activity and cortisol concentration. Saliva flow rates were determined to calculate the s-IgA secretion rate. Data were analysed using a 2-way repeated measures ANOVA and post-hoc t-tests with Holm Bonferroni adjustments applied where appropriate. Time to exhaustion was 35% longer in CAF compared with PLA ((2177 (0.2) vs 1615 (0.16) s; P < 0.05)). Saliva flow rate did not change significantly during the exercise protocol. Exercise was associated with elevations in s-IgA concentration (9% increase), s-IgA secretion rate (24% increase) and alpha-amylase activity (224% increase) post-exhaustion (P < 0.01), but there was no effect of CAF on these responses. Salivary cortisol concentration increased by 64% post-exhaustion in the CAF trial only (P < 0.05), indicating an increase in adrenal activity following caffeine ingestion. Values were 35.7 (5.5) and 19.6 (3.4) nmol/L post-exhaustion for CAF and PLA, respectively. These findings show that ingestion of a caffeine containing cereal bar during prolonged exhaustive cycling enhances endurance performance, increases salivary cortisol secretion post-exhaustion, but does not affect the exercise-induced increases in s-IgA or alpha-amylase activity.

Item Type: Book Section
Additional Information: Published abstract for oral presentation at: 14th Annual Congress of the European College of Sport Science, 24-27 June 2009, Oslo, Norway.
Uncontrolled Keywords: exercise, caffeine, s-IgA, salivary immunoglobulin,
Subjects: R Medicine > RC Internal medicine > RC1200 Sports Medicine
Faculty / Department / Research Group: Faculty of Engineering & Science > Department of Life & Sports Sciences
Related URLs:
Last Modified: 17 Oct 2016 09:09
Selected for GREAT 2016: None
Selected for GREAT 2017: None
Selected for GREAT 2018: None
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/1934

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