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Cumulative effects of incorrect use of pesticides can lead to catastrophic outbreaks of pests

Cumulative effects of incorrect use of pesticides can lead to catastrophic outbreaks of pests

Wang, Xia, Xu, Zihui, Tang, Sanyi and Cheke, Robert A. ORCID: 0000-0002-7437-1934 (2017) Cumulative effects of incorrect use of pesticides can lead to catastrophic outbreaks of pests. Chaos, Solitons & Fractals, 100. pp. 7-19. ISSN 0960-0779 (doi:10.1016/j.chaos.2017.04.030)

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Abstract

Modeling external perturbations such as chemical control within each generation of discrete populations is challenging. Based on a method proposed in the literature, we have extended a discrete single species model with multiple instantaneous pesticide applications within each generation, and then discuss the existence and stability of the unique positive equilibrium. Further, the effects of the timing of pesticide applications and the instantaneous killing rate on the equilibrium were investigated in more detail and we obtained some interesting results, including a paradox and the cumulative effects of the incorrect use of pesticides on pest outbreaks. In order to show the occurrences of the paradox and of hormesis, several special models have been extended and studied. Further, the biological implications of the main results regarding successful pest control are discussed. All of the results obtained confirm that the cumulative effects of incorrect use of pesticides may result in more severe pest outbreaks and thus, in order to avoid a paradox in pest control, control strategies need to be designed with care, including decisions on the timing and number of pesticide applications in relation to the effectiveness of the pesticide being used.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: Non-overlapping generation; Multiple pesticide applications; Paradox; Cumulative effect; Beverton–Holt model
Subjects: S Agriculture > S Agriculture (General)
Faculty / Department / Research Group: Faculty of Engineering & Science
Faculty of Engineering & Science > Natural Resources Institute
Faculty of Engineering & Science > Natural Resources Institute > Agricultural Biosecurity Research Group
Faculty of Engineering & Science > Natural Resources Institute > Agriculture, Health & Environment Department
Last Modified: 23 Apr 2018 00:38
Selected for GREAT 2016: None
Selected for GREAT 2017: None
Selected for GREAT 2018: None
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/17498

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