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A qualitative exploration of motivation to self-manage and styles of self-management amongst people living with type 2 diabetes

A qualitative exploration of motivation to self-manage and styles of self-management amongst people living with type 2 diabetes

Newton, Paul ORCID: 0000-0002-8525-6763, Asimakopoulou, Koula and Scambler, Sasha (2015) A qualitative exploration of motivation to self-manage and styles of self-management amongst people living with type 2 diabetes. Journal of Diabetes Research, 2015:638205. pp. 1-9. ISSN 2314-6745 (Print), 2314-6753 (Online) (doi:10.1155/2015/638205)

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Abstract

The study examined the motives that people living with type 2 diabetes (T2D) had for self-managing their condition and ways they used to assess the success of their self-management efforts. Using semistructured interviews (), focus groups (3 × participants), and open-ended questionnaires (), people living with and self-managing T2D were recruited from a community-based T2D participation group. Most participants were older (aged 60+) and lived in a socioeconomically deprived area in the United Kingdom. Data were analysed thematically using framework analysis. Patients’ motives for self-management included (i) concern about the anticipative effects of T2D; (ii) wishing to “stay well”; (iii) maintaining independence; (iv) reducing the need for healthcare professionals; and (v) improving quality of life. Six self-management styles were found and pertained to self-managing: (i) through routinisation; (ii) as a burden; (iii) as maintenance; (iv) through delegation; (v) through comanagement; and (vi) through autonomy. Motivators for self-management shaped the criteria people used to judge the success of their self-management practices and influenced their self-management style. The findings show that styles of T2D self-management are mediated and moderated by sociocontextual issues. Healthcare professionals should take these into account when supporting people living with T2D.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: Copyright © 2015 Paul Newton et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Uncontrolled Keywords: Diabetes; Self-management; Motivation; Qualitative
Subjects: R Medicine > RA Public aspects of medicine
Faculty / Department / Research Group: Faculty of Education & Health
Faculty of Education & Health > Department of Family Care & Mental Health
Last Modified: 11 Apr 2017 08:44
Selected for GREAT 2016: GREAT a
Selected for GREAT 2017: None
Selected for GREAT 2018: None
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/14597

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