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Improved shelf-life and consumer acceptance of fresh-cut and fried potato strips by an edible coating of garden cress seed mucilage

Improved shelf-life and consumer acceptance of fresh-cut and fried potato strips by an edible coating of garden cress seed mucilage

Ali, Marwa R., Parmar, Aditya ORCID: 0000-0002-2662-1900, Niedbala, Gniewko, Wojciechowski, Tomasz, El-Yazied, Ahmed Abou, El-Gawad, Hany G. Abd, Nahhas, Nihal E., Ibrahim, Mohamed F. M. and El-Mogy, Mohamed M. (2021) Improved shelf-life and consumer acceptance of fresh-cut and fried potato strips by an edible coating of garden cress seed mucilage. Foods, 10 (7):1536. ISSN 2304-8158 (Print), 2304-8158 (Online) (doi:https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10071536)

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Abstract

Coatings that reduce the fat content of fried food are an alternate option to reach both health concerns and consumer demand. Mucilage of garden cress (Lepidium sativum) seed extract (MSE) was modified into an edible coating with or without ascorbic acid (AA) to coat fresh-cut potato strips during cold storage (5 °C and 95% RH for 12 days) and subsequent frying. Physical attributes such as color, weight loss, and texture of potato strips coated with MSE solutions with or without AA showed that coatings efficiently delayed browning, reduced weight loss, and maintained the texture during cold storage. Moreover, MSE with AA provided the most favorable results in terms of reduction in oil uptake. In addition, the total microbial count was lower for MSE-coated samples when compared to the control during the cold storage. MSE coating also performed well on sensory attributes, showing no off flavors or color changes. As a result, the edible coating of garden cress mucilage could be a promising application for extending shelf-life and reducing the oil uptake of fresh-cut potato strips.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: lepidium sativum, potato, browning index, oil uptake, antioxidant activity
Subjects: S Agriculture > S Agriculture (General)
Faculty / School / Research Group: Faculty of Engineering & Science
Faculty of Engineering & Science > Natural Resources Institute
Faculty of Engineering & Science > Natural Resources Institute > Food & Markets Department
Related URLs:
Last Modified: 09 Sep 2021 15:43
Selected for GREAT 2016: None
Selected for GREAT 2017: None
Selected for GREAT 2018: None
Selected for GREAT 2019: None
Selected for REF2021: None
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/33813

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