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Neurophysiological changes induced by music-supported therapy for recovering upper extremity function after stroke: a case series

Neurophysiological changes induced by music-supported therapy for recovering upper extremity function after stroke: a case series

Ghai, Shashank, Dal Maso, Fabien, Ogourtsova, Tatiana, Porxas, Alba-Xifra ORCID: 0000-0002-9023-2432, Villeneuve, Myriam, Penhune, Virginia, Boudrias, Marie-Helene, Baillet, Sylvain and Lamontagne, Anouk (2021) Neurophysiological changes induced by music-supported therapy for recovering upper extremity function after stroke: a case series. Brain Sciences, 11 (5):666. ISSN 2076-3425 (Online) (doi:https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci11050666)

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Abstract

Music-supported therapy (MST) follows the best practice principles of stroke rehabilitation and has been proven to instigate meaningful enhancements in motor recovery post-stroke. The existing literature has established that the efficacy and specificity of MST relies on the reinforcement of auditory-motor functional connectivity in related brain networks. However, to date, no study has attempted to evaluate the underlying cortical network nodes that are key to the efficacy of MST post-stroke. In this case series, we evaluated changes in connectivity within the auditory-motor network and changes in upper extremity function following a 3-week intensive piano training in two stroke survivors presenting different levels of motor impairment. Connectivity was assessed pre- and post-training in the α- and the β-bands within the auditory-motor network using magnetoencephalography while participants were passively listening to a standardized melody. Changes in manual dexterity, grip strength, movement coordination, and use of the upper extremity were also documented in both stroke survivors. After training, an increase in the clinical measures was accompanied by enhancements in connectivity between the auditory and motor network nodes for both the α- and the β-bands, especially in the affected hemisphere. These neurophysiological changes associated with the positive effects of post-stroke MST on motor outcomes delineate a path for a larger scale clinical trial.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: neurorehabilitation, motor learning; functional connectivity, auditory-motor coupling
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
Faculty / Department / Research Group: Faculty of Education, Health & Human Sciences
Faculty of Education, Health & Human Sciences > Department of Psychology, Social Work & Counselling
Last Modified: 07 Jun 2021 09:50
Selected for GREAT 2016: None
Selected for GREAT 2017: None
Selected for GREAT 2018: None
Selected for GREAT 2019: None
Selected for REF2021: None
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/32979

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