Skip navigation

“Make the shoe fit the horse, not the horse fit the shoe”. Exploring the challenges of developing academic skills and academic confidence with farriery students at the Royal Veterinary College

“Make the shoe fit the horse, not the horse fit the shoe”. Exploring the challenges of developing academic skills and academic confidence with farriery students at the Royal Veterinary College

Pullen, Sophie and Rapley, Eve ORCID: 0000-0002-7672-6129 (2017) “Make the shoe fit the horse, not the horse fit the shoe”. Exploring the challenges of developing academic skills and academic confidence with farriery students at the Royal Veterinary College. In: International Symposium of the Veterinary Schools Council (VetEd), 5-7th July 2017, University of Liverpool.

Full text not available from this repository. (Request a copy)

Abstract

There is an old saying amongst farriers … “Make the shoe fit the horse, not the horse fit the shoe”. Tutors from the RVC Learning Development team have taken inspiration from this adage when designing and facilitating an academic study skills module for the newly created Graduate Diploma in Equine Locomotor Research (GDELR) programme. In response to the growing need to recognise the essential role farriers play in maintaining equine health and welfare, the GDELR programme is aimed at strengthening the evidence base of farriery, and reinforcing the importance of farriers as allied professionals within the wider veterinary/animal care sector. The programme aspires to develop research and enquiry skills amongst a community of working farriers, in order to generate new knowledge and understanding of farriery and foot care. By way of prefacing the specific scientific content modules, students take part in a 12 week blended learning module covering academic writing, reading, information searching and communication, all of which culminate in students producing a 3000 word, Level 6 essay at the end of the module. This is commonly the first academic assessment the students have done since school. Typically the cohort is comprised of mature students, many of which have specific learning differences, poor school experiences and low confidence. As such, they might typically be classed as being students from a widening participation background. Drawing up pedagogic and inclusive education literature, the team will facilitate participants to explore notions of personalised and inclusive learning, consider the relative fragility of learning and reflect upon barriers to learning for students at their own institutions. Within an interactive workshop, student video narratives from the first GDELR cohort will provide participants with the opportunity to begin to understand the lived experiences of students who are returning to learning after many years of absence. With an emphasis on exploring solutions to engage and motivate students, participants will take part in practical activities and discussions as a means of teasing out why students can find academic writing and reading so daunting, and how teachers and tutors can smooth the student journey by exploring their own teaching practices, and developing approaches towards greater inclusivity.

Item Type: Conference or Conference Paper (Lecture)
Uncontrolled Keywords: vet education; widening participation; farriery; study skills; academic development; blended learning; pedagogy
Subjects: L Education > LC Special aspects of education > LC5201 Education extension. Adult education. Continuing education
Faculty / Department / Research Group: Educational Development Unit
Greenwich Research into Innovative Pedagogies (GRIP)
Last Modified: 19 Feb 2021 17:15
Selected for GREAT 2016: None
Selected for GREAT 2017: None
Selected for GREAT 2018: None
Selected for GREAT 2019: None
Selected for REF2021: None
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/30675

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item