Skip navigation

Governance, leadership and university values: do universities critique social norms and values, or copy them

Governance, leadership and university values: do universities critique social norms and values, or copy them

McNay, Ian (2019) Governance, leadership and university values: do universities critique social norms and values, or copy them. In: Gibbs, Paul, Jameson, Jill ORCID: 0000-0002-9545-8078 and Elwick, Alex, (eds.) Values of the University in a Time of Uncertainty. Springer International Publishing, Dordrecht, pp. 89-105. ISBN 978-3030159696 (doi:https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-15970-2_7)

[img] PDF (Author Accepted Book Chapter)
23271 MCNAY_Governance_Leadership_and_University_Values_(V. 1)_2019.pdf - Updated Version
Restricted to Registered users only

Download (548kB) | Request a copy
[img] PDF (Author Draft Book Chapter)
23271 MCNAY_Governance_Leadership_and_University_Values_2019.pdf - Draft Version
Restricted to Registered users only

Download (548kB) | Request a copy

Abstract

The New Zealand Education Act of 1989 lists characteristics of universities, including ‘a role as critic and conscience of society’. My contention here is that universities in the UK, at corporate and senior manager level, have lost the moral high ground necessary to fulfil such a role. The Code of Practice of the Committee of University Chairs (of governors) sets the Nolan Principles of conduct in public life as a benchmark for recognised standards of good practice, but states that members must act in line with the accepted standards of behaviour in public life. I demonstrate that what is accepted in action – operational values and standards – falls well below espoused values and principles. With mass participation, universities have become part of mainstream society, not separate, monastic communities in the reflective Newman tradition. They, therefore, receive attention from a press acting as their ‘critic and conscience’. I examine some of the discourse used in this context, straddling the campus boundary in scope and style. The values essential to academic autonomy operate throughout a university, so enacted values will be examined within the context of organisation culture to draw out lessons from contemporary events to show how they mirror campus norms, as well as to emphasise to leaders the ethics and behavioural standards essential within a higher education context in defending the exceptionality of universities.

Item Type: Book Section
Uncontrolled Keywords: Governance, Leadership, Culture, Social norms, Accountability
Subjects: L Education > LB Theory and practice of education
Faculty / Department / Research Group: Faculty of Education & Health
Faculty of Education & Health > Centre for Leadership & Enterprise
Faculty of Education & Health > Department of Education & Community Studies
Related URLs:
Last Modified: 01 Oct 2019 16:16
Selected for GREAT 2016: None
Selected for GREAT 2017: None
Selected for GREAT 2018: None
Selected for GREAT 2019: GREAT 5
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/23271

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year

View more statistics