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Borders, Risk and Belonging: challenges for arts-based research in understanding the lives of women asylum seekers and migrants ‘at the borders of humanity.’

Borders, Risk and Belonging: challenges for arts-based research in understanding the lives of women asylum seekers and migrants ‘at the borders of humanity.’

O’Neill, Maggie, Erel, Umut, Kaptani, Erene and Reynolds, Tracey (2019) Borders, Risk and Belonging: challenges for arts-based research in understanding the lives of women asylum seekers and migrants ‘at the borders of humanity.’. Crossings: Journal of Migration and Culture, 10 (1). pp. 129-147. ISSN 2040-4344 (doi:https://doi.org/10.1386/cjmc.10.1.129_1)

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Abstract

This paper critically discusses the experiences of women who are seeking asylum in the North East of England and women who are mothers with no recourse to public funds living in London to address the questions posed by the special issue. It argues both epistemologically and methodologically for the benefits of undertaking participatory arts-based, ethno-mimetic, performative methods with women and communities to better understand women’s lives, build local capacity in seeking policy change, as well as contribute to theorising necropolitics through praxis. Drawing upon artistic outcomes of research funded by the Leverhulme Trust on borders, risk, and belonging, and collaborative research funded by the ESRC/NCRM using participatory theatre and walking methods, the paper addresses the questions posed by the special issue: how is statelessness experienced by women seeking asylum and mothers with no recourse to public funds? To what extent are their lived experiences marked by precarity, social and civil death? What does it mean to be a woman and a mother in these precarious times, ‘at the borders of humanity’? Where are the spaces for resistance and how might we as artists and researchers – across the arts, humanities, and social sciences – contribute and activate?

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: migration, families, participatory methods, walking,
Faculty / Department / Research Group: Faculty of Architecture, Computing & Humanities
Faculty of Architecture, Computing & Humanities > Applied Sociology Research Group
Faculty of Architecture, Computing & Humanities > Department of History, Politics & Social Sciences
Related URLs:
Last Modified: 23 Jun 2019 00:16
Selected for GREAT 2016: None
Selected for GREAT 2017: None
Selected for GREAT 2018: None
Selected for GREAT 2019: GREAT 2
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/22989

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