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Structuring and coding in health care records: a qualitative analysis using diabetes as a case study

Structuring and coding in health care records: a qualitative analysis using diabetes as a case study

Robertson, Ann R. R., Fernando, Bernard, Morrison, Zoe, Kalra, Dipak and Sheikh, Aziz (2015) Structuring and coding in health care records: a qualitative analysis using diabetes as a case study. Journal of Innovation in Health Informatics, 22 (2). pp. 275-283. ISSN 2058-4555 (Print), 2058-4563 (Online) (doi:https://doi.org/10.14236/jhi.v22i2.90)

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Abstract

Background:
Globally, diabetes mellitus presents a substantial burden to individuals and healthcare systems. Structuring and/or coding of medical records underpin attempts to improve information sharing and searching, potentially bringing clinical and secondary uses benefits.

Aims and objectives:
We investigated if, how and why records for adults with diabetes were structured and/or coded, and explored stakeholders’ perceptions of current practice.

Methods:
We carried out a qualitative, theoretically-informed case study of documenting healthcare information for diabetes patients in family practice and hospital settings, using semi-structured interviews, observations, systems demonstrations and documentary data.

Results:
We conducted 22 interviews and four on-site observations, and reviewed 25 documents. For secondary uses – research, audit, public health and service planning – the benefits of highly structured and coded diabetes data were clearly articulated. Reported clinical benefits in terms of managing and monitoring diabetes, and perhaps encouraging patient self-management, were modest. We observed marked differences in levels of record structuring and/or coding between settings, and found little evidence that these data were being exploited to improve information sharing between them.

Conclusions:
Using high levels of data structuring and coding in medical records for diabetes patients has potential to be exploited more fully, and lessons might be learned from successful developments elsewhere in the UK.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: diabetes mellitus, medical records, clinical coding, qualitative research
Subjects: R Medicine > R Medicine (General)
Faculty / Department / Research Group: Faculty of Business
Faculty of Business > Department of Human Resources & Organisational Behaviour
Last Modified: 18 Sep 2019 08:17
Selected for GREAT 2016: None
Selected for GREAT 2017: None
Selected for GREAT 2018: None
Selected for GREAT 2019: None
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/21322

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