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The impact of coaching relationship satisfaction, self-reflection and self-esteem: coachees' self-monitoring as a moderator

The impact of coaching relationship satisfaction, self-reflection and self-esteem: coachees' self-monitoring as a moderator

Rank, Johannes and Gray, David E. ORCID: 0000-0002-3881-5083 (2017) The impact of coaching relationship satisfaction, self-reflection and self-esteem: coachees' self-monitoring as a moderator. Consulting Psychology Journal: Practice and Research, 69 (3). pp. 187-208. ISSN 1065-9293 (Print), 1939-0149 (Online) (doi:https://doi.org/10.1037/cpb0000082)

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Abstract

Although theoretical and applied work has emphasized the critical role of coachee personality in the coaching process, little quantitative research has identified specific personality traits as moderating variables. Drawing from social psychological theories, we examined coachees’ ability to modify self-presentation, a major facet of the self-monitoring construct, as a moderator of the relationships between executive coaching and coachees’ satisfaction with the coaching relationship, career-related self-exploration and self-esteem. Using a sample of managerial coachees who were either unemployed or at risk of becoming unemployed and who participated in a series of executive coaching sessions, we found support for most of our hypotheses. Overall coaching as well as specific coaching factors, particularly goal development, were significantly and positively associated with relationship satisfaction and self-exploration. Overall coaching and transformative learning dimensions of coaching (goal development and past reappraisal) related more strongly and positively to self-exploration among coachees high in self-presentation ability, whereas overall coaching and psychosocial dimensions of coaching (confidence enhancement and relationship building) related more strongly and positively to relationship satisfaction among coachees low in self-presentation ability. Therefore, our theoretical considerations and empirical results suggest that coachees differing in self-presentation ability respond differently to coaching in general and to specific coach behaviors in particular.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: Coaching; self-monitoring; self-presentation; self-exploration; self-esteem;
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
H Social Sciences > HD Industries. Land use. Labor > HD28 Management. Industrial Management
Faculty / Department / Research Group: Faculty of Business
Faculty of Business > Department of Human Resources & Organisational Behaviour
Related URLs:
Last Modified: 10 Jun 2019 13:34
Selected for GREAT 2016: None
Selected for GREAT 2017: GREAT c
Selected for GREAT 2018: None
Selected for GREAT 2019: GREAT 1
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/16337

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