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The effect of HRM attributions on emotional exhaustion and the mediating roles of job involvement and work overload

The effect of HRM attributions on emotional exhaustion and the mediating roles of job involvement and work overload

Shantz, Amanda, Arevshatian, Lilith, Alfes, Kerstin and Bailey, Katie (2016) The effect of HRM attributions on emotional exhaustion and the mediating roles of job involvement and work overload. Human Resource Management Journal (HRMJ), 26 (2). pp. 172-191. ISSN 0954-5395 (Print), 1748-8583 (Online) (doi:https://doi.org/10.1111/1748-8583.12096)

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Abstract

Although some research suggests that perceptions of HRM practices are associated with lower levels of employee wellbeing, other research shows just the opposite. In the present study, we attempt to reconcile these discrepant findings by incorporating the role of HRM attributions. Our model posits that when employees perceive that their organisation’s HRM practices are intended to improve their job performance, they experience higher levels of job involvement, which leads to lower levels of emotional exhaustion. Conversely, when employees believe that their organisation’s HRM practices are intended to reduce organisational costs, they experience work overload, which translates into higher levels of emotional exhaustion. Parallel mediation analyses of survey data collected from employees of a construction and consultancy organisation at two time periods (n=180) supported this theoretical model.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: (2016) The effect of HRM attributions on emotional exhaustion and the mediating roles of job involvement and work overload. Human Resource Management Journal, 26: 172–191, which has been published in final form at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/1748-8583.12096/abstract. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Self-Archiving.
Uncontrolled Keywords: Attributions of HRM practices; Emotional exhaustion; Job involvement; Work overload
Faculty / Department / Research Group: Faculty of Business
Faculty of Business > Department of Human Resources & Organisational Behaviour
Last Modified: 29 May 2019 09:04
Selected for GREAT 2016: None
Selected for GREAT 2017: None
Selected for GREAT 2018: None
Selected for GREAT 2019: GREAT 2
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/14288

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