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Iron-fortified rice is as efficacious as supplemental iron drops in infants and young children

Iron-fortified rice is as efficacious as supplemental iron drops in infants and young children

Beinner, Mark A., Velasquez-Meléndez, Gustavo, Pessoa, Milene C. and Greiner, Ted (2009) Iron-fortified rice is as efficacious as supplemental iron drops in infants and young children. The Journal of Nutrition, 140 (1). pp. 49-53. ISSN 0022-3166 (Print), 1541-6100 (Online) (doi:10.3945/jn.109.112623)

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Abstract

How to improve iron status among infants and young children is of continued concern in low- to middle-income countries, including Brazil. In a double blind, 5-mo, home-based, randomized trial in Brazil, we gave one group of mildly anemic 6- to 24-mo-old children (n = 175) rice fortified with micronized ferric pyrophosphate using the Ultra Rice technology and a placebo solution (URG) and another group identical nonfortified rice and iron drops. We instructed parents on the correct dosage of iron drops and to feed their children rice as they normally would. We measured serum ferritin (SF) and hemoglobin (Hb) concentrations at baseline and at 5 mo. At baseline, the prevalences of iron deficiency and anemia in the total sample were 73.1 and 100%, respectively. At 5 mo, SF and Hb increased in both groups, although the change in the URG was larger (P < 0.01). Adult participants were unable to distinguish cooked fortified rice from unfortified rice in terms of smell, color, or taste. As rice is normally consumed at home, MPF-fortified rice increased iron stores and reduced anemia in a group of mildly anemic children 6–24 mo old. In populations where young children are routinely fed ∼100 g of cooked rice daily, fortifying it with iron may improve iron status at least as well as providing free iron drops.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: [1] Supported by the Minas Gerais State Government Grant, Minas Gerais, Brazil.
Uncontrolled Keywords: infants, young children, nutrition, fortified rice, iron
Subjects: R Medicine > RJ Pediatrics > RJ101 Child Health. Child health services
S Agriculture > SB Plant culture
Faculty / Department / Research Group: Faculty of Engineering & Science > Natural Resources Institute
Related URLs:
Last Modified: 11 Sep 2014 12:39
Selected for GREAT 2016: None
Selected for GREAT 2017: None
Selected for GREAT 2018: None
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/9546

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