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Full Report. Understanding long-acting reversible contraception: an in-depth investigation into sub-dermal contraceptive implant removal amongst young women in London. A report for the London Sexual Health Commissioning Programme

Full Report. Understanding long-acting reversible contraception: an in-depth investigation into sub-dermal contraceptive implant removal amongst young women in London. A report for the London Sexual Health Commissioning Programme

Hoggart, Lesley, Newton, Victoria and Dickson, Jane (2013) Full Report. Understanding long-acting reversible contraception: an in-depth investigation into sub-dermal contraceptive implant removal amongst young women in London. A report for the London Sexual Health Commissioning Programme. Project Report. University of Greenwich, School of Health & Social Care, London, UK.

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Abstract

There has been significant focus in recent years, in the UK, on long-acting reversible contraception (LARC) and the impact that LARC use could have on reducing rates of unwanted and unintended pregnancy (NICE 2005). Long-acting reversible contraceptives (IUD, IUS, contraceptive implant, contraceptive injection) are highly effective methods of contraception. In addition they are discreet and do not require daily user compliance. However, despite these apparently positive features, LARC methods are less popular than might be expected, and there has been considerable discussion about why these seemingly convenient and effective methods have had such a low user uptake (Williamson et al 2009, Glaiser et al 2008, Tanfer et al 2000). With respect to the implant, an expensive form of contraception, work undertaken by NICE (2005) had shown geographical inconsistencies suggesting uneven access to the method. More recently, data suggest that women continue to experience uneven access, with London having the second lowest uptake of the implant in any English region.

Item Type: Monograph (Project Report)
Additional Information: [1] The research was commissioned by the London Sexual Health Commissioning Programme, and funded from ‘improving access to contraception funds’. [2] Published by Research & Development, School of Health & Social Care, University of Greenwich, Avery Hill Campus, London.
Uncontrolled Keywords: contraception, implants, LARC, sexual health
Pre-2014 Departments: School of Health & Social Care
Related URLs:
Last Modified: 14 Oct 2016 09:23
Selected for GREAT 2016: None
Selected for GREAT 2017: None
Selected for GREAT 2018: None
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/9500

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