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The role of Islamic marketing researchers: scribes, oracles, trend spotters – or thought leaders? Setting the agenda

The role of Islamic marketing researchers: scribes, oracles, trend spotters – or thought leaders? Setting the agenda

Wilson, Jonathan (2012) The role of Islamic marketing researchers: scribes, oracles, trend spotters – or thought leaders? Setting the agenda. Journal of Islamic Marketing, 3 (2). pp. 104-107. ISSN 1759-0833 (doi:10.1108/17590831211232591)

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Abstract

Purpose – The purpose of this paper is first, as a sort of “health check”, to examine the research approaches, aims and sentiments of academics in the field – based upon their output. Second, to raise key questions with the aim of elevating scholarship within Islamic marketing and its sub-disciplines – through encouraging thought leadership, grounded in: more rigorous and in-depth application of Islamic knowledge; and transformational scholarship – through intellect rooted in creativity and heterodoxy.

Design/methodology/approach – The paper employs a grounded theory approach to phenomenological investigation, based upon desk reviews of published and unpublished manuscripts from the Journal of Islamic Marketing. Investigations were also supported by expert knowledge elicitation from Editorial Advisory Board members and reviewers; using participant observation methods and data collected from manuscript reviews.

Findings – There are varying perspectives and standpoints which can be adopted, which in turn will raise divergent philosophical positions. However, it appears that many opt for approaches rooted in a dogma of heterodoxy. It is argued that a broader collection of lenses, more creative and revolutionary scholarship, and a greater depth of Islamic knowledge comparable to that shown in the critical appraisal of marketing sub-disciplines are needed – as a necessary process of generative discovery in an emergent field.

Originality/value – This paper gives consideration to a fan of philosophical epistemologies, also offering guidance on the sourcing of further supporting Islamic texts, beyond the Qur'an and ahadith. In addition, two brief examples of Islamic data theory are presented.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: [1] This article was the Editorial in the Journal of Islamic Marketing, 2012, Vol.3, No.2, pp.104-107
Uncontrolled Keywords: brands, consumer behaviour, culture, Halal, Islam, Islamic branding, Islamic jurisprudence, Islamic marketing, marketing, Muslim consumer behaviour, research methods
Subjects: H Social Sciences > HF Commerce
Faculty / Department / Research Group: Faculty of Business > Department of Marketing, Events & Tourism
Related URLs:
Last Modified: 14 Oct 2016 09:22
Selected for GREAT 2016: None
Selected for GREAT 2017: None
Selected for GREAT 2018: None
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/9202

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