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Ship design with the human factor: evacuation and normal operations modelling in the ship design process

Ship design with the human factor: evacuation and normal operations modelling in the ship design process

Deere, Steven John (2012) Ship design with the human factor: evacuation and normal operations modelling in the ship design process. PhD thesis, University of Greenwich.

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Abstract

This thesis addresses the modelling of human factors and how they can impact ship design. Two different but related applications areas are considered; passenger ship evacuation analysis and naval vessel normal operations and evacuation analysis.

In the first instance, this thesis investigates the impact of the current regulatory specified passenger response time distributions upon evacuation analysis and then recommends a more realistic passenger response time distribution which should be implemented when performing an evacuation analysis of a passenger RO-RO vessel. This realistic passenger response time distribution is based upon the results of sea trials. The results of this analysis have been adopted by the IMO and form part of the new guideline document, IMO MSC 1238.

In addition, this thesis addresses the analysis of the human factors’ performance of a naval vessel. Naval vessels are built primarily for undertaking assigned missions in times of war and conflict. While the safety of those on board is important, the ability of the vessel to function and complete its assigned mission is of paramount importance. This thesis utilises an evacuation model, maritimeEXODUS, which was extended to incorporate the functionality of modelling non-evacuation scenarios, to assess the human factors’ performance of a naval vessel during both normal operations and evacuation scenarios.

This thesis develops a methodology for simultaneously assessing the human factors’ performance of both a range of normal operation scenarios and evacuation scenario on board a naval vessel. The methodology, called the Human Performance Metric (HPM), is discriminating, diagnostic, systematic, transparent and reproducible in nature.

This thesis then implements the HPM methodology into the early stages of the design cycle for a new naval vessel. The thesis presents the software modifications required to implement the methodology in to the design cycle as well as presenting a demonstration of the new system.

Item Type: Thesis (PhD)
Additional Information: uk.bl.ethos.571448
Uncontrolled Keywords: human performance metric, HPM, computer modelling, ship design, human factors, passenger ship evacuation analysis, naval vessel evacuation analysis,
Subjects: Q Science > QA Mathematics > QA76 Computer software
V Naval Science > VM Naval architecture. Shipbuilding. Marine engineering
Pre-2014 Departments: School of Computing & Mathematical Sciences
School of Computing & Mathematical Sciences > Department of Mathematical Sciences
Related URLs:
Last Modified: 17 Mar 2017 15:41
Selected for GREAT 2016: None
Selected for GREAT 2017: None
Selected for GREAT 2018: None
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/9148

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