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Performance and genetic variation of big-leaf mahogany (Swietenia macrophylla King) in provenance and progeny trials in the Yucatan Peninsula of Mexico

Performance and genetic variation of big-leaf mahogany (Swietenia macrophylla King) in provenance and progeny trials in the Yucatan Peninsula of Mexico

Wightman, Kevyn E., Ward, Sheila E., Haggar, Jeremy P., Santiago, Bartolo Rodríguez and Cornelius, Jonathan P. (2008) Performance and genetic variation of big-leaf mahogany (Swietenia macrophylla King) in provenance and progeny trials in the Yucatan Peninsula of Mexico. Forest Ecology and Management, 255 (2). pp. 346-355. ISSN 0378-1127 (doi:10.1016/j.foreco.2007.09.056)

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Abstract

Stocks of the valuable big-leaf mahogany (Swietenia macrophylla King) are declining, and trials for growth and pest resistance are needed to select material for plantations. Seeds were collected from 67 open-pollinated trees from five provenances in the Yucatan Peninsula of Mexico and planted in three provenance/progeny trials in the state of Quintana Roo, Mexico, in order to characterize genetic variation in growth traits and for Hypsipyla resistance or recovery, and to assess the potential for genetic gain. Differentiation among provenances was found only for relative height growth rate (RHGR). The total years of apical attack by Hypsipyla grandella varied by a magnitude of 100% among families but showed little heritability. After 4 years, mean height per family ranged from 328 to 564 cm, 160 to 381 cm, and 253 to 390 cm at each site. Although heritabilities for height were too low for cross-site selection, sufficient heritability (h2I¼ 0:26), additive genetic coefficients of variation (AGCV = 22%), and type B genetic correlations (rb(f) = 0.74) for RHGR across the two sites with poorer growth indicated that this trait might be used as a surrogate. This would yield an estimated gain of about 17% for the best 15% of trees. At the site with better growth, there was sufficient heritability (h2/I 0:31) and AGCV (20%) for height at year 5 to obtain an estimated gain of 15% for the best 15% of trees.We suggest a selection strategy using the best germplasm from the best performing trial to exploit the resources on high quality sites, and the best material from the poorer sites for lower quality areas.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: [1] Published: 10 March 2008. [2] Published as: Forest Ecology and Management, (2008), Vol. 255, (2) pp. 346-355.
Uncontrolled Keywords: Hypsipyla grandella, genetic gain, tree domestication, tropical hardwoods
Subjects: S Agriculture > S Agriculture (General)
S Agriculture > SD Forestry
Faculty / Department / Research Group: Faculty of Engineering & Science > Natural Resources Institute
Faculty of Engineering & Science > Natural Resources Institute > Agriculture, Health & Environment Department
Related URLs:
Last Modified: 02 Jul 2013 14:11
Selected for GREAT 2016: None
Selected for GREAT 2017: None
Selected for GREAT 2018: None
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/8233

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