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Using the Rural Economic and Enterprise Development (REED) framework for analysis and joint action: outline and workplan for action research

Using the Rural Economic and Enterprise Development (REED) framework for analysis and joint action: outline and workplan for action research

Davis, Junior, Proctor, Felicity and Marr, Ana (2004) Using the Rural Economic and Enterprise Development (REED) framework for analysis and joint action: outline and workplan for action research. Working Paper. Natural Resources Institute, University of Greenwich, Chatham Maritime, UK.

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Abstract

The framework for fostering Rural Economic and Enterprise Development (REED) which is based on the analysis of successes and experiences of programmes and projects by an international group of practitioners from different professional backgrounds and countries is an example of a more holistic and spatial approach to local, rural and urban development. The framework, which tries to address the shortcomings of the traditional rural-urban dichotomy, is comprised of ten cornerstones for successful intervention, covering the policy and institutional dimension, access to infrastructure, services and markets, entrepreneurial competence and stakeholder links (see Figure 1).
The REED framework can be applied at different levels, i.e., national and regional, because it is areabased. For example, many decisions concerning the political, economic and institutional environment for Rural Economic and Enterprise Development are made at national level. Decision-makers on public policies for rural areas are charged with designing strategies for rural development. Increasingly, this is done in a programmatic way, such as in inter-ministerial committees for designing PRSPs, sector investment programmes (SIPs) and sector-wide approaches (SWAPs). The REED framework adds value to the planning process because it feeds the perceptions, needs and experiences of relevant stakeholders in a systematic way.
Where the focus is on developing a certain region (at sub-national level), regional development authorities can use the REED framework to create a dynamic environment for economic activity and to stimulate innovation. In this way, the specific characteristics of the region and the relevant framework conditions can be taken into consideration when elaborating and formulating key strategies, processes and possible ways to implement them, related to the individual cornerstones (see Figure 1).
Within the cycle of typical government and donor-supported public investment, policies/ interventions, there are several options for applying the REED framework.

Item Type: Monograph (Working Paper)
Uncontrolled Keywords: rural economy, development, finance
Subjects: G Geography. Anthropology. Recreation > GE Environmental Sciences
H Social Sciences > HD Industries. Land use. Labor
S Agriculture > S Agriculture (General)
Faculty / Department / Research Group: Faculty of Engineering & Science > Natural Resources Institute
Faculty of Engineering & Science > Natural Resources Institute > Food & Markets Department
Faculty of Business > Department of International Business & Economics
Related URLs:
Last Modified: 14 Oct 2016 09:20
Selected for GREAT 2016: None
Selected for GREAT 2017: None
Selected for GREAT 2018: None
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/8130

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