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Anomalies in the results obtained from rotating disc accelerator erosion testers: a discussion of possible causes

Anomalies in the results obtained from rotating disc accelerator erosion testers: a discussion of possible causes

Burnett, A.J., Bradley, M.S.A., O'Flynn, D.J., Deng, T. and Bingley, M. (1999) Anomalies in the results obtained from rotating disc accelerator erosion testers: a discussion of possible causes. Wear, 233-5. pp. 275-283. ISSN 0043-1648 (doi:10.1016/s0043-1648(99)00227-6)

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Abstract

During recent erosion research at the University of Greenwich using a rotating disc accelerator erosion tester no peak has been observed in the curve of erosion damage vs. angle of impingement. This lack of peak has been observed for tests on a range of steels at a variety of particle impact velocities and fluxes and is contrary to previously reported results. Results of erosion tests on targets at various orientations are given in this paper. The targets used in this work were all made from 0.8% carbon steel (SAE1074). It is shown that changing the orientation of the target in such a tester can lead to different mechanisms of impact erosion occurring owing to changes in the particle dynamics at impact. Several reasons for this behaviour are suggested by the authors including: (a) the variation of particle flux across the target surface as the angle of orientation of the target to the flow of particles is changed, (b) the variation in the occurrence of inter-particulate collisions with the angle of target orientation, and (c) the effects of particle sliding on the walls of the acceleration mechanism inducing particle spin such that the mechanism of cutting is increased at low angles of particle impingement. During recent erosion research at the University of Greenwich using a rotating disc accelerator erosion tester no peak has been observed in the curve of erosion damage vs. angle of impingement. This lack of peak has been observed for tests on a range of steels at a variety of particle impact velocities and fluxes and is contrary to previously reported results. Results of erosion tests on targets at various orientations are given in this paper. The targets used in this work were all made from 0.8% carbon steel (SAE1074). It is shown that changing the orientation of the target in such a tester can lead to different mechanisms of impact erosion occurring owing to changes in the particle dynamics at impact. Several reasons for this behaviour are suggested by the authors including: (a) the variation of particle flux across the target surface as the angle of orientation of the target to the flow of particles is changed, (b) the variation in the occurrence of inter-particulate collisions with the angle of target orientation, and (c) the effects of particle sliding on the walls of the acceleration mechanism inducing particle spin such that the mechanism of cutting is increased at low angles of particle impingement.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: [1] The financial assistance of The Leverhulme Trust, whose award to The University of Greenwich for this work, is gratefully acknowledged. [2] Cited By (since 1996) 10; Conference of Proceedings of the 1998 International Conference on Erosive and Abrasive Wear (ICEAW) - 9th International Conference on Erosion by Liquid and Solid Impact (ELSI IX); Conference Date: 13 September 1998 through 17 September 1998; Conference Code: 56270.
Uncontrolled Keywords: carbon steel, impact testing, particles, particulate matter, wear of materials, interparticulate collision, rotating disc accelerator erosion testers, target orientation, erosion, rotating disc, wear testing,
Subjects: Q Science > QC Physics
Faculty / Department / Research Group: Faculty of Engineering & Science > Wolfson Centre for Bulk Solids Handling Technology
Related URLs:
Last Modified: 17 Oct 2016 10:03
Selected for GREAT 2016: None
Selected for GREAT 2017: None
Selected for GREAT 2018: None
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/7260

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