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Cryptic diversity within the major trypanosomiasis vector Glossina fuscipes revealed by molecular markers

Cryptic diversity within the major trypanosomiasis vector Glossina fuscipes revealed by molecular markers

Dyer, Naomi A., Ravel, Sophie, Choi, Kwang-Shik, Darby, Alistair C., Causse, Sandrine, Kapitano, Berisha, Hall, Martin J.R., Steen, Keith, Lutumba, Pascal, Madinga, Joules, Torr, Steve J., Okedi, Loyce M., Lehane, Michael J. and Donnelly, Martin J. (2011) Cryptic diversity within the major trypanosomiasis vector Glossina fuscipes revealed by molecular markers. PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases, 5 (8). e1266. ISSN 1935-2735 (doi:10.1371/journal.pntd.0001266)

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Abstract

Background: The tsetse fly Glossina fuscipes s.l. is responsible for the transmission of approximately 90% of cases of human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) or sleeping sickness. Three G. fuscipes subspecies have been described, primarily based upon subtle differences in the morphology of their genitalia. Here we describe a study conducted across the range of this important vector to determine whether molecular evidence generated from nuclear DNA (microsatellites and gene sequence information), mitochondrial DNA and symbiont DNA support the existence of these taxa as discrete taxonomic units.

Principal Findings: The nuclear ribosomal Internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) provided support for the three subspecies. However nuclear and mitochondrial sequence data did not support the monophyly of the morphological subspecies G. f.fuscipes or G. f. quanzensis. Instead, the most strongly supported monophyletic group was comprised of flies sampled fromEthiopia. Maternally inherited loci (mtDNA and symbiont) also suggested monophyly of a group from Lake Victoria basin and Tanzania, but this group was not supported by nuclear loci, suggesting different histories of these markers. Microsatellite data confirmed strong structuring across the range of G. fuscipes s.l., and was useful for deriving the interrelationship of closely related populations.

Conclusion/Significance: We propose that the morphological classification alone is not used to classify populations of G. fuscipes for control purposes. The Ethiopian population, which is scheduled to be the target of a sterile insect release (SIT) programme, was notably discrete. From a programmatic perspective this may be both positive, given that it may reflect limited migration into the area or negative if the high levels of differentiation are also reflected in reproductive isolation between this population and the flies to be used in the release programme.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: [1] Published on August 9, 2011. [2] ISSN 1935-2735 (Online). [3] Copyright: (c) 2011 Dyer et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited. [4] The definitive version can be accessed at PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases - http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pntd.0001266.
Uncontrolled Keywords: tsetse, trypanosomiasis, sleeping sickness, Glossina, population genetics, Glossina fuscipes
Subjects: S Agriculture > S Agriculture (General)
S Agriculture > SF Animal culture
Faculty / Department / Research Group: Faculty of Engineering & Science > Natural Resources Institute
Faculty of Engineering & Science > Natural Resources Institute > Agriculture, Health & Environment Department
Faculty of Engineering & Science > Natural Resources Institute > Pest Behaviour Research Group
Related URLs:
Last Modified: 18 Nov 2016 11:22
Selected for GREAT 2016: None
Selected for GREAT 2017: None
Selected for GREAT 2018: None
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/6841

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