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Seeking a robust strategy to use chlorophyll fluorescence to assess physiological damage of fresh produce

Seeking a robust strategy to use chlorophyll fluorescence to assess physiological damage of fresh produce

Rees, D., Simantara, P., Ross, M., Brownridge, S., Westby, A., Johnson, D. and Poole, R. (2010) Seeking a robust strategy to use chlorophyll fluorescence to assess physiological damage of fresh produce. In: Herppich, W.B., (ed.) Proceedings of the Third International Conference Postharvest Unlimited 2008. Acta Horticulturae (858). International Society for Horticultural Science, Leuven, Belgium, pp. 399-406. ISBN 978-90-66052-06-2 ISSN 0567-7572

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Abstract

Chlorophyll fluorescence has been tested by many researchers as a non-invasive method to assess physiological damage in chlorophyll containing fruits and vegetables. The characteristic Fv/Fm is most commonly considered. One draw-back of this method is that the fluorescence signal is affected primarily by the state of photosystem II, which is one of the components most sensitive to stresses, including heat, chilling and oxidative stress, so that the Fv/Fm may be more sensitive than the overall tissue. A more reliable strategy may be to look at the ability of the tissues to resynthesise photosystem II after damage, by looking at the rate of Fv/Fm recovery. This strategy shows promising results in predicting chilling injury in peppers and cucumbers, and heat stress in asparagus. Trials are also reported that attempt to predict low temperature injury in apples, but the results are not definitive.

Item Type: Book Section
Additional Information: [1] This paper was first presented at the (3rd) III International Conference Postharvest Unlimited 2008, organized by the International Society for Horticultural Science (ISHS) and held from 5-7 November 2008 in Berlin, Germany. [2] Paper published in ISHS Acta Horticulturae 858: III International Conference Postharvest Unlimited 2008. [3] This title is available both in print and ActaHort CD-rom format. [4] Funding for the investigation on low temperature storage of ‘Cox’ apples was provided by the Horticulture Development Company, UK.
Uncontrolled Keywords: chlorophyll fluorescence, postharvest, Fv/Fm, chilling injury, heat stress, photoinhibition, cucumber, pepper, asparagus, apple
Faculty / Department / Research Group: Faculty of Engineering & Science > Natural Resources Institute
Faculty of Engineering & Science > Natural Resources Institute > Food & Markets Department
Related URLs:
Last Modified: 20 Dec 2012 09:53
Selected for GREAT 2016: None
Selected for GREAT 2017: None
Selected for GREAT 2018: None
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/6515

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