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A finite volume unstructured mesh approach to dynamic fluid–structure interaction: an assessment of the challenge of predicting the onset of flutter

A finite volume unstructured mesh approach to dynamic fluid–structure interaction: an assessment of the challenge of predicting the onset of flutter

Slone, A.K., Pericleous, K. ORCID: 0000-0002-7426-9999, Bailey, C., Cross, M. and Bennett, C. (2004) A finite volume unstructured mesh approach to dynamic fluid–structure interaction: an assessment of the challenge of predicting the onset of flutter. Applied Mathematical Modelling, 28 (2). pp. 211-239. ISSN 0307-904X (doi:10.1016/S0307-904X(03)00142-2)

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Abstract

Computational modelling of dynamic fluid–structure interaction (DFSI) is a considerable challenge. Our approach to this class of problems involves the use of a single software framework for all the phenomena involved, employing finite volume methods on unstructured meshes in three dimensions. This method enables time and space accurate calculations in a consistent manner. One key application of DFSI simulation is the analysis of the onset of flutter in aircraft wings, where the work of Yates et al. [Measured and Calculated Subsonic and Transonic Flutter Characteristics of a 45° degree Sweptback Wing Planform in
Air and Freon-12 in the Langley Transonic Dynamic Tunnel. NASA Technical Note D-1616, 1963] on the AGARD 445.6 wing planform still provides the most comprehensive benchmark data available. This paper presents the results of a significant effort to model the onset of flutter for the AGARD 445.6 wing planform geometry. A series of key issues needs to be addressed for this computational approach.
• The advantage of using a single mesh, in order to eliminate numerical problems when applying boundary
conditions at the fluid-structure interface, is counteracted by the challenge of generating a suitably high
quality mesh in both the fluid and structural domains.
• The computational effort for this DFSI procedure, in terms of run time and memory requirements, is very significant. Practical simulations require even finer meshes and shorter time steps, requiring parallel
implementation for operation on large, high performance parallel systems.
• The consistency and completeness of the AGARD data in the public domain is inadequate for use in the validation of DFSI codes when predicting the onset of flutter.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: fluid–structure interaction, finite volume, transient structural dynamics, geometric conservation law, Newmark algorithm
Subjects: Q Science > QA Mathematics
Pre-2014 Departments: School of Computing & Mathematical Sciences > Centre for Numerical Modelling & Process Analysis > Computational Science & Engineering Group
School of Computing & Mathematical Sciences
School of Computing & Mathematical Sciences > Department of Mathematical Sciences
Related URLs:
Last Modified: 14 Oct 2016 09:15
Selected for GREAT 2016: None
Selected for GREAT 2017: None
Selected for GREAT 2018: None
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/5978

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