Skip navigation

Cross-national research using contemporary birth cohort studies: a look at early maternal employment in the United Kingdom and United States

Cross-national research using contemporary birth cohort studies: a look at early maternal employment in the United Kingdom and United States

Crosby, Danielle and Hawkes, Denise (2008) Cross-national research using contemporary birth cohort studies: a look at early maternal employment in the United Kingdom and United States. Working Paper. Centre for Longitudinal Studies, Institute of Education, London.

Full text not available from this repository.

Abstract

The recent establishment of two national longitudinal studies of contemporary birth cohorts in the United Kingdom and United States creates a valuable opportunity for cross-national research on the early life experiences of young children and their families. This paper describes these new datasets and highlights the potential advantages and challenges of their combined use. To illustrate some of the issues involved in this type of research, we present the results of parallel analyses examining the patterns and predictors of British and American mothers‘ (re)entry into the labour force in the first 9 months post-birth. Similar to previous studies, we find that US mothers engage in paid work at much faster rates following the birth of a child than mothers in the UK. In both samples, mothers‘ human capital and other indicators of advantage predict higher rates (and earlier entries) of post-birth employment. However, within the subset of mothers most strongly attached to the labour force, i.e., those with recent employment experience, it is socioeconomic disadvantage that predicts sooner returns—but, only for US mothers. Lessons learned and directions for future research with these data are discussed

Item Type: Monograph (Working Paper)
Additional Information: [1] ISBN = 9781906929084 [2] CLS Cohort Studies Working Paper, 2008/13 [3] A shorter version of this paper appeared in the International Journal of Social Research Methodology, 10(5), pp. 379-404 (2007) http://gala.gre.ac.uk/7285
Uncontrolled Keywords: female labour supply
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
H Social Sciences > HB Economic Theory
Faculty / Department / Research Group: Faculty of Business > Centre for Business Network Analysis
Faculty of Business > Department of International Business & Economics
Faculty of Business > Greenwich Political Economy Research Centre (GPERC)
Related URLs:
Last Modified: 02 Nov 2016 13:52
Selected for GREAT 2016: None
Selected for GREAT 2017: None
Selected for GREAT 2018: None
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/4810

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item