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Cross-national research using contemporary birth cohort studies: a look at early maternal employment in the UK and USA

Cross-national research using contemporary birth cohort studies: a look at early maternal employment in the UK and USA

Crosby, Danielle A. and Hawkes, Denise D. (2007) Cross-national research using contemporary birth cohort studies: a look at early maternal employment in the UK and USA. International Journal of Social Research Methodology, 10 (5). pp. 379-404. ISSN 1364-5579 (Print), 1464-5300 (Online) (doi:10.1080/13645570701677151)

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Abstract

The recent establishment of two national, longitudinal studies of contemporary birth cohorts in the UK and USA creates a valuable opportunity for cross‐national research on the experiences of young children and their families. This article describes these new datasets and highlights the potential advantages and challenges of their combined use. To illustrate some of the issues involved in comparative research, we describe our study of the patterns and predictors of UK and US mothers’ (re)entry into the labour force during infants’ first 9 months of life. Similar to previous studies, we find that US mothers engage in paid work much sooner after childbirth than UK mothers. In both samples, greater financial and human capital predict higher rates (and earlier entries) of post‐birth employment; however, among the subset of US mothers who were employed pre‐birth, it is socioeconomic disadvantage that predicts sooner returns. We consider how different policy environments in the UK and USA help to explain these findings, and discuss directions for future research with these data.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: [1] Version of record first published: 26 Oct 2007.
Uncontrolled Keywords: female, labour, supply
Subjects: H Social Sciences > HD Industries. Land use. Labor
H Social Sciences > HN Social history and conditions. Social problems. Social reform
H Social Sciences > HQ The family. Marriage. Woman
Faculty / Department / Research Group: Faculty of Business > Greenwich Political Economy Research Centre (GPERC)
Faculty of Business
Related URLs:
Last Modified: 02 Nov 2016 13:52
Selected for GREAT 2016: None
Selected for GREAT 2017: None
Selected for GREAT 2018: None
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/4805

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