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Field assessment of the efficacy and persistence of diatomaceous earths in protecting stored grain on small-scale farms in Zimbabwe

Field assessment of the efficacy and persistence of diatomaceous earths in protecting stored grain on small-scale farms in Zimbabwe

Stathers, T.E., Mvumi, B.M. and Golob, P. (2002) Field assessment of the efficacy and persistence of diatomaceous earths in protecting stored grain on small-scale farms in Zimbabwe. Crop Protection, 21 (10). pp. 1033-1048. ISSN 0261-2194 (doi:10.1016/S0261-2194(02)00088-1)

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Abstract

Farmers and grain traders in sub-Saharan Africa are forced to sell stored produce prematurely because of deterioration due mostly to insect damage. Producers expressed a need for a relatively cheap and safe method of insect control. Diatomaceous earths (DE) offer safer alternatives to synthetic chemicals, but information on their efficacy under tropical small-scale farming conditions is lacking. Two commercially available DE products, Protect-Its and Dryacides, were tested against the major post-harvest insect
pests of grains and pulses. On-farm field trials in Zimbabwe showed that both inert dusts gave significant protection against insect damage when admixed with farm stored maize, sorghum and cowpeas for periods of 40 weeks. However, efficacy of these DEs is closely linked to the application rates and differs between commodities, locations and insect pests. An admixture application rate of
0.1% w/w of Protect-Its or Dryacides can be recommended to protect both maize and cowpea grain that is to be stored for 4 months or longer in Zimbabwe. However, Dryacides was not effective in preventing damage to sorghum grain by the bostrichid Rhyzopertha dominica unless applied at a higher rate of 0.2% w/w.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: diatomaceous earths, pest management, stored grain and pulses, food security, smallholder storage, grain protection
Subjects: S Agriculture > S Agriculture (General)
S Agriculture > SB Plant culture
Faculty / Department / Research Group: Faculty of Engineering & Science > Natural Resources Institute
Related URLs:
Last Modified: 10 Nov 2011 11:47
Selected for GREAT 2016: None
Selected for GREAT 2017: None
Selected for GREAT 2018: None
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/4090

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