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Evolution, epidemiology, and population genetics of black flies (Diptera: Simuliidae)

Evolution, epidemiology, and population genetics of black flies (Diptera: Simuliidae)

Adler, Peter H., Cheke, Robert A. ORCID: 0000-0002-7437-1934 and Post, Rory J. (2010) Evolution, epidemiology, and population genetics of black flies (Diptera: Simuliidae). Infection, Genetics and Evolution, 10 (7). pp. 846-865. ISSN 1567-1348 (doi:10.1016/j.meegid.2010.07.003)

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Abstract

More than 2000 species of black flies feed on vertebrate blood; 1.5% of all species are vectors of pathogens that cause human diseases. Of nine simuliid-borne animal diseases, only two, mansonellosis and onchocerciasis, afflict humans. Onchocerciasis is a debilitating disease infecting an estimated 40 million people in Africa, Latin America, and Yemen, whereas mansonellosis is a mild disease in the Neotropics. Cytogenetic studies of natural populations of more than 500 species of black flies have revealed that the classic morphospecies of taxonomists is typically a complex of two or more reproductively isolated entities, or sibling (cryptic) species. Most vectors of human pathogens are sibling species, each ecologically unique in traits such as breeding habitats, dispersal capabilities, and degree of vector competence. We review the evolution of black flies, the cytogenetics that have revealed about 260 cytologically distinct entities, the molecular studies that continue to expose additional hidden
biodiversity, and a case study of the epidemiology of the Simulium damnosum complex, the largest species complex of blood-feeding arthropods on Earth and the premier group of black flies responsible for human onchocerciasis.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: blackflies, chromosomes,cytogenetics, mansonellosis, molecular genetics, onchocerciasis, Onchocerca volvulus, sibling species, Simulium damnosum complex, vector-borne disease
Subjects: S Agriculture > S Agriculture (General)
S Agriculture > SF Animal culture
Faculty / Department / Research Group: Faculty of Engineering & Science > Natural Resources Institute
Faculty of Engineering & Science > Natural Resources Institute > Pest Behaviour Research Group
Related URLs:
Last Modified: 09 Nov 2012 16:03
Selected for GREAT 2016: None
Selected for GREAT 2017: None
Selected for GREAT 2018: None
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/3920

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