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Differential effect of hot water treatment on whole tubers versus cut setts of yam (Dioscorea spp.)

Differential effect of hot water treatment on whole tubers versus cut setts of yam (Dioscorea spp.)

Coyne, Daniel L., Claudius-Cole, Abiodun O., Kenyon, Lawrence and Baimey, Hugues (2010) Differential effect of hot water treatment on whole tubers versus cut setts of yam (Dioscorea spp.). Pest Management Science, 66 (4). pp. 385-389. ISSN 1526-4998 (online) (doi:10.1002/ps.1887)

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Abstract

BACKGROUND: The use of thermotherapy or hotwater treatment (HWT) is recommended for the management of plant-parasitic nematodes and other pathogens for a range of planting material, especially vegetatively propagated crops including yams, Dioscorea spp. The sprouting (germination) and consequent viability of yam following HWT, however, appear to be influenced by the post-treatment method of planting (whole or cut setts) and cultivar. The present study was established to evaluate the sensitivity of the most popular yam cultivars in Benin and Nigeria, West Africa, to HWT at 50–53 ◦C for 20min.
RESULTS: Sprouting of both setts and whole tubers of most cultivars was affected by HWT. Across experiments, 47% of HWT material, compared with 61% of non-HWT material, sprouted over 8 weeks. When cut into setts, 41% of HWT or untreated tubers sprouted, compared with 72% of whole tubers. Whole, untreated tubers had highest sprouting rates (84%), and setts following HWT had the lowest (38%). Yam planting material was also not completely free of parasitic nematodes following HWT. The reaction to HWT or cutting was highly cultivar specific.
CONCLUSION: Yam cultivars vary in their sensitivity to hot water therapy. Care is therefore advised in selecting yam cultivars for HWT, especially when using cut setts.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: Pest Management Science is published on behalf of the Society of Chemical Industry (SCI).
Uncontrolled Keywords: healthy planting material, plant-parasitic nematodes, Scutellonema bradys, seed systems, West Africa, yam cultivar
Subjects: S Agriculture > S Agriculture (General)
S Agriculture > SB Plant culture
Faculty / Department / Research Group: Faculty of Engineering & Science > Natural Resources Institute
Related URLs:
Last Modified: 08 Jan 2013 14:19
Selected for GREAT 2016: None
Selected for GREAT 2017: None
Selected for GREAT 2018: None
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/3452

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