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Occurrence of three genotypic clusters of Bemisia tabaci and the rapid spread of the B biotype in south India

Occurrence of three genotypic clusters of Bemisia tabaci and the rapid spread of the B biotype in south India

Rekha, A.R., Maruthi, M.N., Muniyappa, V. and Colvin, J. (2005) Occurrence of three genotypic clusters of Bemisia tabaci and the rapid spread of the B biotype in south India. Entomologia Experimentalis et Applicata, 117 (3). pp. 221-233. ISSN 0013-8703 (doi:10.1111/j.1570-7458.2005.00352.x)

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Abstract

The whitefly, Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) (Homoptera: Aleyrodidae), is generally considered to have originated from the Indian subcontinent, although little information has so far been collected on the molecular diversity of populations present in this region. The genetic diversity of B. tabaci populations from Karnataka State, south India was analysed using the random amplified polymorphic DNA polymerase chain reaction (RAPD-PCR) technique and partial mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I (mtCOI) gene sequences (689 bases) of 22 selected samples. A total of 108 whitefly samples analysed by RAPD-PCR produced 89 polymorphic bands, and cluster analyses grouped them according to their geographic origin into ‘north’ and ‘south’ Karnataka. Phylogenetic analysis of mtCOI gene sequences with reference B. tabaci sequences from other Asian countries divided them into three genotypic clusters. Each cluster was supported with high bootstrap values (82–100%) and the individuals belonging to each cluster shared high nucleotide identities (up to 100%). This indicated at least three distinct genotypes, apparently indigenous to India, which are also present in China, Malaysia, Nepal, Pakistan, and Thailand. These coexist with the B biotype, which was first reported in India in 1999, and has since spread rapidly to other states in south India. The B biotype was more common than the indigenous B. tabaci, in locations where it had been present for more than 2 years. This is reminiscent of the situation in the Americas during the early 1990s, where the B biotype replaced existing biotypes and caused unprecedented losses to agriculture.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: homoptera, aleyrodidae, RAPD-PCR, cytochrome oxidase I gene, phylogenetics, whitefly, molecular variability
Subjects: S Agriculture > S Agriculture (General)
S Agriculture > SB Plant culture
Faculty / Department / Research Group: Faculty of Engineering & Science > Natural Resources Institute
Faculty of Engineering & Science > Natural Resources Institute > Agriculture, Health & Environment Department
Related URLs:
Last Modified: 16 May 2016 11:31
Selected for GREAT 2016: None
Selected for GREAT 2017: None
Selected for GREAT 2018: None
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/3376

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