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Current status and perspectives of accelerated carbonation processes on municipal waste combustion residues

Current status and perspectives of accelerated carbonation processes on municipal waste combustion residues

Costa, Giulia, Baciocchi, Renato, Polettini, Alessandra, Pomi, Raffaella, Hills, Colin D. and Carey, Paula J. (2007) Current status and perspectives of accelerated carbonation processes on municipal waste combustion residues. Environmental Monitoring and Assessment, 135 (1-3). pp. 55-75. ISSN 0167-6369 (Print), 1573-2959 (Online) (doi:10.1007/s10661-007-9704-4)

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Abstract

The increasing volumes of municipal solid waste produced worldwide are encouraging the development of processes to reduce the environmental impact of this waste stream. Combustion technology can facilitate volume reduction of up to 90%, with the inorganic contaminants being captured in furnace bottom ash, and fly ash/APC residues. The disposal or reuse of these residues is however governed by the potential release of constituent contaminants into the environment. Accelerated carbonation has been shown to have a potential for improving the chemical stability and leaching behaviour of both bottom ash and fly ash/APC residues. However, the efficacy of carbonation depends on whether the method of gas application is direct or indirect. Also important are the mineralogy, chemistry and physical properties of the fresh ash, the carbonation reaction conditions such as temperature, contact time, CO2 partial pressure and relative humidity. This paper reviews the main issues pertaining to the application of accelerated carbonation to municipal waste combustion residues to elucidate the potential benefits on the stabilization of such residues and for reducing CO2 emissions. In particular, the modification of ash properties that occur upon carbonation and the CO2 sequestration potential possible under different conditions are discussed. Although accelerated carbonation is a developing technology, it could be introduced in new incinerator facilities as a "finishing step" for both ash treatment and reduction of CO2 emissions.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: air pollution control (APC) residues, bottom ashes (BA), carbonation, CO2, incineration, leaching
Subjects: T Technology > TD Environmental technology. Sanitary engineering
Q Science > QD Chemistry
Faculty / Department / Research Group: Faculty of Engineering & Science
Faculty of Engineering & Science > Department of Pharmaceutical, Chemical & Environmental Sciences
Related URLs:
Last Modified: 17 Oct 2016 09:10
Selected for GREAT 2016: None
Selected for GREAT 2017: None
Selected for GREAT 2018: None
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/2479

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