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Development of an odour-baited target for female New World screwworm, Cochliomyia hominivorax: studies with host baits and synthetic wound fluids

Development of an odour-baited target for female New World screwworm, Cochliomyia hominivorax: studies with host baits and synthetic wound fluids

Cork, A. and Hall, M.J.R. (2007) Development of an odour-baited target for female New World screwworm, Cochliomyia hominivorax: studies with host baits and synthetic wound fluids. Medical and Veterinary Entomology, 21 (1). pp. 85-92. ISSN 0269-283X (Print), 1365-2915 (Online) (doi:10.1111/j.1365-2915.2006.00661.x)

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Abstract

Field studies were conducted in Mexico to investigate the possibility of replacing sentinel animals as baits for female New World screwworm Cochliomyia hominivorax (Coquerel) (Diptera: Calliphoridae) with a synthetic odour-bait composed of compounds identified from wounds infested with the larvae of C. hominivorax. Studies using sheep held in stanchions surrounded by an incomplete ring of electrified nets showed that both male and female C. hominivorax were attracted to an unwounded animal (ratio of male : female flies caught 1.11 : 1.00), although they were not observed to land. By contrast, catches associated with unwounded sheep with larval wound fluid applied to shaven shoulders suggested that female C. hominivorax were attracted to(male : female ratio of electrified nets catch 0.14 : 1.00) and landed on the wound fluid but male flies did not respond (male : female ratio alighting on fluid 0.05 : 1.00). In related studies the attractiveness of synthetic blends of 25 electrophysiologically active compounds identified in fluids associated with wounds infested with the larvae of C. hominivorax were tested. The acidic components of the wound fluids were found to attract and elicit a landing response from both male and female flies, whereas the nonacidic components alone caught only low numbers of flies. However, the numbers of male and female flies that were attracted to and landed on a synthetic bait could be increased significantly by increasing the proportion of non-acid to acid components in the lure. In some replicates the most effective blend caught a number of C. hominivorax comparable to that caught by a standard synthetic attractant, Swormlure-4, although,
unlike with Swormlure-4, the catch was predominately composed of female flies. It is uncertain whether Swormlure-4 contains compounds that elicit a landing response from male C. hominivorax or whether the synthetic and natural wound odours contain compounds that inhibit a landing response from male C. hominivorax . Further work is required to simplify the blend of compounds needed to attract female flies and to better understand the role of the compounds that elicit behavioural responses from both male and female C. hominivorax before a synthetic substitute can be fully developed to replace sentinel animals.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: Cochliomyia hominivorax, attractant baits, larval wound fluid, screwworm, sentinel animals
Subjects: S Agriculture > S Agriculture (General)
S Agriculture > SF Animal culture
Faculty / Department / Research Group: Faculty of Engineering & Science > Natural Resources Institute
Faculty of Engineering & Science > Natural Resources Institute > Agriculture, Health & Environment Department
Faculty of Engineering & Science
Related URLs:
Last Modified: 18 Aug 2015 14:33
Selected for GREAT 2016: None
Selected for GREAT 2017: None
Selected for GREAT 2018: None
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/2369

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