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Current control methods for diamondback moth and other brassica insect pests and the prospects for improved management with lepidopteran-resistant Bt vegetable brassicas in Asia and Africa

Current control methods for diamondback moth and other brassica insect pests and the prospects for improved management with lepidopteran-resistant Bt vegetable brassicas in Asia and Africa

Grzywacz, D., Rossbach, A., Rauf, A., Russell, D.A., Srinivasan, R. and Shelton, A.M. (2009) Current control methods for diamondback moth and other brassica insect pests and the prospects for improved management with lepidopteran-resistant Bt vegetable brassicas in Asia and Africa. Crop Protection, 29 (1). pp. 68-79. ISSN 0261-2194 (doi:10.1016/j.cropro.2009.08.009)

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Abstract

The diamondback moth (DBM), Plutella xylostella (L.), remains a major pest of brassica crops worldwide. DBM has been estimated globally to cost US$ 1 billion in direct losses and control costs. Chemical control of this pest remains difficult due to the rapid development of resistance to insecticides and to their effect on natural enemies. These problems are especially severe in South Asia and Africa where lack of knowledge, limited access to newer and safer insecticides, and a favourable climate result in DBM remaining a serious year-round pest which substantially increases the cost and uncertainty of crop production. Despite these problems, application of synthetic insecticides remains overwhelmingly the most common control strategy. Biologically-based efforts to control DBM in Africa and Asia have focused strongly on parasitoid introductions. However, despite the identification and deployment of promising parasitoids in many regions, these efforts have had limited impact, often because farmers continue early-season spraying of broad-spectrum insecticides that are lethal to parasitoids and thus exacerbate DBM outbreaks. A significant driver for this pattern of insecticide use is the presence of aphids and other pests whose appearance initiates inappropriate spraying. Despite often extensive training of producers in farmer field schools, many growers seem loath to discard calendar or prophylactic spraying of insecticides. The introduction of an IPM technology that could replace the use of broad-spectrum insecticides for DBM and other key Lepidoptera is crucial if the benefits of parasitoid introduction are to be fully realised. The deployment of DBM-resistant brassicas expressing proteins from Bacillus thuringiensis could help to break this cycle of insecticide misuse and crop loss, but their deployment should be part of an integrated pest management (IPM) package, which recognises the constraints of farmers while addressing the requirement to control other Lepidoptera, aphids and other secondary pests.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: [1] First published: January 2010. [2] Published as: Crop Protection, (2010), Vol. 29, (1), pp. 68–79.
Uncontrolled Keywords: plutella xylostella, Diamondback moth, integrated pest management, insecticide alternatives, insect-resistant crops, Bacillus thuringiensis, Brassica oleracea, Asia, Africa
Subjects: S Agriculture > S Agriculture (General)
S Agriculture > SF Animal culture
S Agriculture > SB Plant culture
Faculty / Department / Research Group: Faculty of Engineering & Science > Natural Resources Institute
Faculty of Engineering & Science > Natural Resources Institute > Agriculture, Health & Environment Department
Related URLs:
Last Modified: 15 Oct 2013 15:17
Selected for GREAT 2016: None
Selected for GREAT 2017: None
Selected for GREAT 2018: None
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/2040

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