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Influence of carbonation on the acid neutralization capacity of cements and cement-solidified/stabilized electroplating sludge

Influence of carbonation on the acid neutralization capacity of cements and cement-solidified/stabilized electroplating sludge

Chen, Quanyuan, Zhang, Lina, Ke, Yujuan, Hills, Colin and Kang, Yanming (2009) Influence of carbonation on the acid neutralization capacity of cements and cement-solidified/stabilized electroplating sludge. Chemosphere, 74 (6). pp. 758-764. ISSN 0045-6535 (doi:10.1016/j.chemosphere.2008.10.044)

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Abstract

Portland cement (PC) and blended cements containing pulverized fuel ash (PFA) or granulated blast-furnace slag (GGBS) were used to solidify/stabilize an electroplating sludge in this work. The acid neutralization capacity (ANC) of the hydrated pastes increased in the order of PC > PC/GGBS > PC/PFA. The GGBS or PFA replacement (80 wt%) reduced the ANC of the hydrated pastes by 30–50%. The ANC of the blended cement-solidified electroplating sludge (cement/sludge 1:2) was 20–30% higher than that of the hydrated blended cement pastes. Upon carbonation, there was little difference in the ANC of the three cement pastes, but the presence of electroplating sludge (cement/sludge 1:2) increased the ANC by 20%. Blended cements were more effective binders for immobilization of Ni, Cr and Cu, compared with PC, whereas Zn was encapsulated more effectively in the latter. Accelerated carbonation improved the immobilization of Cr, Cu and Zn, but not Ni. The geochemical code PHREEQC, with the edited database from EQ3/6 and HATCHES, was used to calculate the saturation index and solubility of likely heavy metal precipitates in cement-based solidification/stabilization systems. The release of heavy metals could be related to the disruption of cement matrices and the remarkable variation of solubility of heavy metal precipitates at different pH values.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: solidification/stabilization, heavy metals, blended cement, accelerated carbonation, thermodynamic modeling
Subjects: T Technology > TD Environmental technology. Sanitary engineering
Q Science > QD Chemistry
Faculty / Department / Research Group: Faculty of Engineering & Science > Department of Pharmaceutical, Chemical & Environmental Sciences
Related URLs:
Last Modified: 08 Dec 2016 14:50
Selected for GREAT 2016: None
Selected for GREAT 2017: None
Selected for GREAT 2018: None
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/1672

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