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Microwave curing of thermosetting polymer materials in microelectronics applications

Microwave curing of thermosetting polymer materials in microelectronics applications

Ferenets, M., Tilford, Tim, Sinclair, Keith I., Bailey, Christopher and Desmulliez, Marc P.Y. (2009) Microwave curing of thermosetting polymer materials in microelectronics applications. In: Baltic Polymer Symposium 2009, 22-25 September 2009, Ventspils, Latvia.

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Abstract

Thermosetting polymer materials are widely utilised in modern microelectronics packaging technology. These materials are used for a number of functions, such as for device bonding, for structural support applications and for physical protection of semiconductor dies. Typically,
convection heating systems are used to raise the temperature of the materials to expedite the polymerisation process. The convection cure process has a number of drawbacks including
process durations generally in excess of 1 hour and the requirement to heat the entire printed circuit board assembly, inducing thermomechanical stresses which effect device reliability.
Microwave energy is able to raise the temperature of materials in a rapid, controlled manner. As the microwave energy penetrates into the polymer materials, the heating can be considered volumetric – i.e. the rate of heating is approximately constant throughout the material. This enables a maximal heating rate far greater than is available with convection oven systems which only raise the surface temperature of the polymer material and rely on thermal conductivity to transfer heat energy into the bulk. The high heating rate, combined with the ability to vary the operating power of the microwave system, enables the extremely rapid cure processes.
Microwave curing of a commercially available encapsulation material has been studied experimentally and through use of numerical modelling techniques. The material assessed is
Henkel EO-1080, a single component thermosetting epoxy. The producer has suggested three typical convection oven cure options for EO1080: 20 min at 150C or 90 min at 140C or 120 min at 110C. Rapid curing of materials of this type using advanced microwave systems, such as the FAMOBS system [1], is of great interest to microelectronics system manufacturers as it has the potential to reduce manufacturing costs, increase device reliability and enables new device designs.
Experimental analysis has demonstrated that, in a realistic chip-on-board encapsulation scenario, the polymer material can be fully cured in approximately one minute. This
corresponds to a reduction in cure time of approximately 95 percent relative to the convection oven process. Numerical assessment of the process [2] also suggests that cure times of approximately 70 seconds are feasible whilst indicating that the decrease in process duration comes at the expense of variation in degree of cure within the polymer.

Item Type: Conference or Conference Paper (Paper)
Additional Information: This paper is understood (not confirmed) to form part of the Book of Abstracts of the Baltic Polymer Symposium, held 22-25 September 2009, Ventspils, Latvia. These were published prior to the conference and consisted of 1-page (uncorrected) abstracts submitted by authors.
Uncontrolled Keywords: microwave curing, thermosetting polymer materials, microelectronics packaging
Subjects: T Technology > TK Electrical engineering. Electronics Nuclear engineering
Pre-2014 Departments: School of Computing & Mathematical Sciences > Centre for Numerical Modelling & Process Analysis
School of Computing & Mathematical Sciences
School of Computing & Mathematical Sciences > Centre for Numerical Modelling & Process Analysis > Computational Mechanics & Reliability Group
School of Computing & Mathematical Sciences > Department of Computer Systems Technology
School of Computing & Mathematical Sciences > Department of Mathematical Sciences
School of Computing & Mathematical Sciences > Computer & Computational Science Research Group
School of Computing & Mathematical Sciences > Department of Computer Science
School of Computing & Mathematical Sciences > Centre for Numerical Modelling & Process Analysis > Computational Science & Engineering Group
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Last Modified: 14 Oct 2016 09:04
Selected for GREAT 2016: None
Selected for GREAT 2017: None
Selected for GREAT 2018: None
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/1661

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