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Does the exotic equal pollution? Landscape methods for solving the dilemma of planting native versus non-native plant species in drylands

Does the exotic equal pollution? Landscape methods for solving the dilemma of planting native versus non-native plant species in drylands

Kotzen, Benz, Branquinho, Cristina and Prasse, Ruediger Does the exotic equal pollution? Landscape methods for solving the dilemma of planting native versus non-native plant species in drylands. Journal of Arid Environments. ISSN 0140-1963 (Unpublished)

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Abstract

There is a pressing need to resolve methods that can determine native versus non-native plant use in drylands, arid areas and indeed in more temperate areas around the world. This is because whilst plant introductions may have positive objectives they can have negative landscape and ecological impacts. A key discussion on this issue focuses on whether the use of non-native plant species can be considered to be pollution and pollutive, based on the concept that pollution can be regarded as ‘matter out of place’. There are many examples of nature based , e.g. radon or toxic waters but what this paper focuses on is the issue of human induced pollution in the form of planting. This paper aims to determine a number of methods based on sustainability principles and on those used in landscape and environmental impact assessment to determine when and where non-native plants could be used and where native plants should be used. These sometimes simple and sometimes more complex methods are determined by understanding the genius loci / sense of place, and the ‘nature’ of landscape. They are determined through the identity of landscape character, landscape quality, landscape value and sensitivity to change. A complex model using a matrix tool, determines plant use types by combining sensitivity to change of the landscape relative to the magnitude of change that would be caused through the use of non-native plant species.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: drylands, arid lands, native plants. non-native plants, landscape methods
Subjects: G Geography. Anthropology. Recreation > GE Environmental Sciences
S Agriculture > SB Plant culture
Faculty / Department / Research Group: Faculty of Architecture, Computing & Humanities > Department of Architecture & Landscape
Last Modified: 02 May 2017 08:02
Selected for GREAT 2016: None
Selected for GREAT 2017: GREAT a
Selected for GREAT 2018: None
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/15442

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