Skip navigation

Effects of three different conditioning activity volumes on the optimal recovery time for potentiation in college athletes

Effects of three different conditioning activity volumes on the optimal recovery time for potentiation in college athletes

Naclerio, Fernando ORCID: 0000-0001-7405-4894, Chapman, Mark, Larumbe-Zabala, Eneko, Massey, Ben, Neil, Alex and Triplett, Travis N. (2015) Effects of three different conditioning activity volumes on the optimal recovery time for potentiation in college athletes. Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, 29 (9). pp. 2579-2585. ISSN 1064-8011 (Print), 1533-4287 (Online) (doi:10.1519/JSC.0000000000000915)

Full text not available from this repository.

Abstract

This study examined the effect of 3 postactivation potentiation (PAP) protocols, differentiated by volume and with controlled intensity, on the recovery time required to observe enhanced jumping performance in recreationally trained college athletes. Following a randomized controlled order, 11 participants, 7 men and 4 women (age 25.4 ± 2.1 years, height 176.2 ± 7.7 cm, body mass 77.6 ± 7.7 kg), performed a countermovement jump (CMJ) at baseline and at 15 seconds, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, and 12 minutes after the 3 treatment conditions: low volume (LV, parallel squat [PS] with 80%, 1 repetition [rep]), moderate volume (MV, PS with 80%, 1 set of 3 reps), and high volume (HV, PS with 80%, 3 sets of 3 reps). Significantly lower CMJ heights were measured at 3 and 5 minutes from LV to HV (p 0.048) and MV (p 0.005) conditions, respectively. No significant differences were determined when comparing the 8 tested time points within each of the assessed volume protocols. However, effect size analysis indicated that higher CMJ performances displayed from 1 to 8 minutes with respect to both baseline and 15-second performance for MV (d 0.91-3.18) and HV (d 0.79) conditions. In conclusion, MV and HV protocols seem to be more effective to elicit potentiation compared with the LV. However, no relationship between the volume of conditioning activity (CA) and the optimal time point to obtain the maximum potentiation effect was determined. Strength and conditioning professionals are advised to analyze individual PAP responses in terms of the optimal recovery time with regard to different CA configurations. © 2015 National Strength and Conditioning Association.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: Copyright © 2015 by the National Strength & Conditioning Association.
Uncontrolled Keywords: complex training; countermovement jump; parallel squat; explosive performance
Subjects: Q Science > QP Physiology
Faculty / Department / Research Group: Faculty of Engineering & Science
Faculty of Engineering & Science > Centre for Science and Medicine in Sport and Exercise
Faculty of Engineering & Science > Department of Life & Sports Sciences
Related URLs:
Last Modified: 14 Apr 2017 23:41
Selected for GREAT 2016: None
Selected for GREAT 2017: None
Selected for GREAT 2018: None
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/13892

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item