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An evaluation of peer-led self-management training for people with severe psychiatric diagnoses

An evaluation of peer-led self-management training for people with severe psychiatric diagnoses

Cyhlarova, Eva, Crepaz-Keay, David, Reeves, Rachel, Morgan, Kirsten, Iemmi, Valentina and Knapp, Martin (2015) An evaluation of peer-led self-management training for people with severe psychiatric diagnoses. Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, 10 (1). pp. 3-13. ISSN 1755-6228 (Print), 2042-8707 (Online) (doi:10.1108/JMHTEP-08-2014-0020)

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Abstract

Purpose:
The purpose of this paper is to establish the effectiveness of self-management training as an intervention for people using secondary mental health services.

Design/methodology/approach:
A self-management and peer support intervention was developed and delivered by secondary mental health service users to 262 people with psychiatric diagnoses living in the community. Data on wellbeing and health-promoting behaviour were collected at three time points (baseline, six, and 12 months).

Findings:
Participants reported significant improvements in wellbeing and health-promoting lifestyle six and 12 months after self-management training. Peer-led self-management shows potential to improve long-term health outcomes for people with psychiatric diagnoses.

Research limitations/implications:
Due to the lack of a control group, the positive changes cannot definitively be attributed to the intervention. Other limitations were reliance on self-report measures, and the varying numbers of completers at three time points. These issues will be addressed in future studies.

Practical implications:
The evaluation demonstrated the effectiveness of self-management training for people with psychiatric diagnoses, suggesting self-management training may bring significant wellbeing gains for this group.

Social implications:
This study represents a first step in the implementation of self-management approaches into mental health services. It demonstrates the feasibility of people with psychiatric diagnoses developing and delivering an effective intervention that complements existing services.

Originality/value:
This is the first study to investigate the effectiveness of a self-management training programme developed and delivered by mental health service users in the UK.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: Service users, Peer support, Self-management, Mental health services, Recovery, Mental ill-health
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
Faculty / Department / Research Group: Faculty of Education & Health
Faculty of Education & Health > Department of Family Care & Mental Health
Last Modified: 03 Oct 2016 14:04
Selected for GREAT 2016: None
Selected for GREAT 2017: None
Selected for GREAT 2018: None
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/13572

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