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Deathwatch beetle, Xestobium rufovillosum, in historical buildings: monitoring the pest and its predators

Deathwatch beetle, Xestobium rufovillosum, in historical buildings: monitoring the pest and its predators

Belmain, S. R. ORCID: 0000-0002-5590-7545, Simmonds, M. S. J. and Blaney, W. M. (1999) Deathwatch beetle, Xestobium rufovillosum, in historical buildings: monitoring the pest and its predators. Entomologia Experimentalis et Applicata, 93 (1). pp. 97-104. ISSN 0013-8703 (Print), 1570-7458 (Online) (doi:10.1046/j.1570-7458.1999.00566.x)

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Abstract

Trapping and monitoring experimentswere conducted in the roof spaces of four buildings infested with deathwatch
beetle, Xestobium rufovillosum de Geer (Coleoptera: Anobiidae). Data from sticky traps and an ultra-violet insectocutor
showed that adult deathwatch beetles were trapped from May to July. The beetles were attracted to natural
and UV light, and more beetles were caught on white coloured traps than yellow, blue or red traps. Deathwatch
beetles comprised 30–40% of all arthropods caught. The weekly trap catch of all arthropods, including deathwatch
beetle, was positively correlated with ambient temperature. Adult beetles flew in buildings at ambient temperatures
greater than 17 �C. Arthropods caught in the buildings were categorised as resident, over-wintering or non-resident
arthropods. Predatory spiders comprised 13% of arthropods caught and the predatory beetle, Korynetes caeruleus
de Geer, was found in all four buildings. There was no evidence of other predators or parasitoids of the deathwatch
beetle

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: [1] Acknowledgements (funding): This research was conducted as part of the EuropeanUnion Environmental Initiative Programme (Project:4.20.5.6396; contract: EV5V–CT94–0517) on WoodCare. [2] Copyright: © 1999 Kluwer Academic Publishers. Printed in the Netherlands
Uncontrolled Keywords: deathwatch beetle, Xestobium rufovillosum, Coleoptera, Anobiidae, timber pest
Subjects: Q Science > Q Science (General)
Q Science > QL Zoology
Faculty / Department / Research Group: Faculty of Engineering & Science > Natural Resources Institute
Faculty of Engineering & Science > Natural Resources Institute > Agriculture, Health & Environment Department
Faculty of Engineering & Science
Related URLs:
Last Modified: 17 Aug 2015 12:39
Selected for GREAT 2016: None
Selected for GREAT 2017: None
Selected for GREAT 2018: None
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/12536

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