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A systematic methodology to assess the impact of human factors in ship design

A systematic methodology to assess the impact of human factors in ship design

Deere, S.J., Galea, E.R. and Lawrence, P.J. (2007) A systematic methodology to assess the impact of human factors in ship design. Applied Mathematical Modelling, 33 (2). pp. 867-883. ISSN 0307-904X (doi:10.1016/j.apm.2007.12.014)

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Abstract

Evaluating ship layout for human factors (HF) issues using simulation software such as maritimeEXODUS can be a long and complex process. The analysis requires the identification of relevant evaluation scenarios; encompassing evacuation and normal operations; the development of appropriate measures which can be used to gauge the performance of crew and vessel and finally; the interpretation of considerable simulation data. Currently, the only agreed guidelines for evaluating HFs performance of ship design relate to evacuation and so conclusions drawn concerning the overall suitability of a ship design by one naval architect can be quite different from those of another. The complexity of the task grows as the size and complexity of the vessel increases and as the number and type of evaluation scenarios considered increases. Equally, it can be extremely difficult for fleet operators to set HFs design objectives for new vessel concepts. The challenge for naval architects is to develop a procedure that allows both accurate and rapid assessment of HFs issues associated with vessel layout and crew operating procedures. In this paper we present a systematic and transparent methodology for assessing the HF performance of ship design which is both discriminating and diagnostic. The methodology is demonstrated using two variants of a hypothetical naval ship.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: evacuation analysis, evacuation simulation, human factors, naval architecture, ship design, pedestrian dynamics
Subjects: Q Science > QA Mathematics > QA75 Electronic computers. Computer science
V Naval Science > VM Naval architecture. Shipbuilding. Marine engineering
Pre-2014 Departments: School of Computing & Mathematical Sciences
School of Computing & Mathematical Sciences > Centre for Numerical Modelling & Process Analysis
School of Computing & Mathematical Sciences > Centre for Numerical Modelling & Process Analysis > Fire Safety Engineering Group
School of Computing & Mathematical Sciences > Department of Mathematical Sciences
Related URLs:
Last Modified: 16 Oct 2016 05:10
Selected for GREAT 2016: None
Selected for GREAT 2017: None
Selected for GREAT 2018: None
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/1198

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