Skip navigation

Young childless women with breast cancer in the UK: a qualitative study of their fertility-related experiences, options, and the information given by health professionals

Young childless women with breast cancer in the UK: a qualitative study of their fertility-related experiences, options, and the information given by health professionals

Corney, Roslyn Heather and Swinglehurst, Amica Jane (2014) Young childless women with breast cancer in the UK: a qualitative study of their fertility-related experiences, options, and the information given by health professionals. Psycho-Oncology, 23 (1). pp. 20-26. ISSN 1057-9249 (Print), 1099-1611 (Online) (doi:10.1002/pon.3365)

Full text not available from this repository.

Abstract

Objective: A proportion of young women diagnosed with breast cancer are childless. Fertility can be impaired by treatment, and women may have to wait for a number of years before pregnancy is advised. The aim of this qualitative study was to investigate in detail the fertility-related experiences of young childless women with breast cancer, including the information they received, the fertility preservation options given, and the dilemmas they faced.

Method: Interviews were conducted with 19 childless women aged below 45 with first episode breast cancer diagnosed at least 6 months before. They were recruited by contacting the breast cancer charities and were asked to tell their story, with an emphasis on fertility issues. Transcripts were analyzed using the thematic method developed by Braun and Clarke.

Results: The amount of information given to women from health professionals varied considerably. Only half were given the opportunity to pursue assisted reproductive techniques prior to chemotherapy. Most women were worried about what the future might hold, including their fertility, the impact of pregnancy on recurrence, and the health of the child. They were generally given little information or support on these issues.

Conclusions: Young women should be given more detailed information about fertility issues shortly after diagnosis, after chemotherapy, and during follow-up appointments. More holistic care should include emotional support to enable them to make decisions regarding their fertility options and planning for the future.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: Psycho-Oncology is published on behalf of International Psycho-Oncology Society, The American Psychosocial Society and the British Psychosocial Oncology Society.
Uncontrolled Keywords: breast cancer, fertility preservation, artificial reproductive techniques, childless, oncology
Subjects: R Medicine > RG Gynecology and obstetrics
Faculty / Department / Research Group: Faculty of Education & Health > Department of Psychology, Social Work & Counselling
Last Modified: 16 Nov 2016 11:01
Selected for GREAT 2016: None
Selected for GREAT 2017: None
Selected for GREAT 2018: None
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/10533

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item