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Randomized placebo-controlled trial of guava juice as a source of ascorbic acid to reduce iron deficiency in Tarahumara indigenous schoolchildren of Northern Mexico

Randomized placebo-controlled trial of guava juice as a source of ascorbic acid to reduce iron deficiency in Tarahumara indigenous schoolchildren of Northern Mexico

Monárrez-Espino, Joel, López-Alarcón, Mardia and Greiner, Ted (2011) Randomized placebo-controlled trial of guava juice as a source of ascorbic acid to reduce iron deficiency in Tarahumara indigenous schoolchildren of Northern Mexico. Journal of the American College of Nutrition, 30 (3). pp. 191-200. ISSN 0731-5724 (Print), 1541-1087 (Online) (doi:https://doi.org/10.1080/07315724.2011.10719960)

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Abstract

Objective: Assess the efficacy of a 10-week consumption of guava juice on the iron status of children with mild iron deficiency anemia.

Methods: Ninety-five boarding school children aged 6–9 years identified as anemic were randomly allocated to receive 300 mL of natural guava juice containing ∼200 mg of ascorbic acid (AA) or placebo (guava-flavored juice free of AA) with the main meal (5 d/wk). Information about dietary intake was collected at weeks 3, 5, and 7 at school and household levels. Changes in hemoglobin (Hb) and plasma ferritin (PF) among the subsample iron deficient at baseline (n = 33) were the main outcomes.

Results: Iron and phytic acid intakes at school and at home did not differ between groups. Baseline Hb and PF were 11.9 ± 0.5 g/dL and 8.2 ± 3.6 ng/mL for the guava, and 11.4 ± 1.1 g/dL and 7.4 ± 4.6 ng/mL for the placebo group (Hb: p = 0.08; PF: p = 0.31); at week 10 of the study, corresponding values were 13.1 ± 0.9 g/dL and 17.9 ± 10.3 ng/mL (n = 16), and 12.3 ± 1.3 g/dL and 15.4 ± 5.8 ng/mL (n = 12) (Hb: p = 0.05; PF: p = 0.21). With analysis of variance (ANOVA) for repeated measures, the guava group had 0.64 g/dL higher Hb (CI95, 0.18–1.11; p = 0.01) and 2.47 ng/mL higher PF (CI95, −1.04 to 5.98; p = 0.12) compared with the placebo group.

Conclusion: Guava juice providing 200 mg AA at one meal on each school day had a marginal effect on Hb and PF concentrations in children consuming high-phytate diets fortified with iron.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: ascorbic acid, guava, indigenous, iron deficiency anemia, Mexico, schoolchildren, Tarahumara, vitamin C, iron, randomized controlled trial
Subjects: R Medicine > RA Public aspects of medicine > RA0421 Public health. Hygiene. Preventive Medicine
Faculty / Department / Research Group: Faculty of Engineering & Science > Natural Resources Institute
Related URLs:
Last Modified: 11 Sep 2014 12:46
Selected for GREAT 2016: None
Selected for GREAT 2017: None
Selected for GREAT 2018: None
Selected for GREAT 2019: None
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/9913

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