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Evaluating the effectiveness of a road safety education intervention for pre-drivers: An application of the theory of planned behaviour

Evaluating the effectiveness of a road safety education intervention for pre-drivers: An application of the theory of planned behaviour

Poulter, Damian R. ORCID: 0000-0003-2521-5959 and McKenna, Frank P. (2010) Evaluating the effectiveness of a road safety education intervention for pre-drivers: An application of the theory of planned behaviour. British Journal of Educational Psychology, 80 (2). pp. 163-181. ISSN 0007-0998 (Print), 2044-8279 (Online) (doi:https://doi.org/10.1348/014466509X468421)

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Abstract

Background. Young drivers are overrepresented in road traffic fatalities and collisions. Attempts to address this problem with pre-driver education have not met with unambiguous success. However, there is a lack of research on whether pre-driver education can change psychological antecedents to behaviour.

Aims. The framework of the theory of planned behaviour (TPB) was employed to assess the effectiveness of an educational intervention used across the UK that aims to improve attitudes to road safety in pre-drivers.
Sample(s). Secondary school students aged 15–16 years participated in the research, drawn from 12 schools in the UK. A total of 199 students took part in Expt 1 and 430 in Expt 2.

Method. Expt 1 employed a within-participants design to measure any changes in road safety beliefs from pre- to post-intervention and 5-month follow-up. Expt 2 used a between-participants design to test whether any changes were genuine or due to experimenter effects.

Results. Results of Expt 1 revealed a small, short-term improvement in some pre-driver beliefs immediately following the educational intervention, but no effect on other beliefs, and some evidence of unintended outcomes. The small, significant improvements found in Expt 1were replicated in Expt 2, which is consistent with there being a genuine effect.

Conclusions. Considering evidence from both experiments suggests the effectiveness of road safety education interventions are at best short term, and limited to some but not all psychological factors, with some risk of unintended consequences.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: n/a
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
Pre-2014 Departments: School of Health & Social Care
School of Health & Social Care > Department of Psychology & Counselling
Related URLs:
Last Modified: 14 Oct 2016 09:22
Selected for GREAT 2016: None
Selected for GREAT 2017: None
Selected for GREAT 2018: None
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/8858

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