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Pesticidal plants: a viable alternative insect pest management approach for resource-poor farming in Africa.

Pesticidal plants: a viable alternative insect pest management approach for resource-poor farming in Africa.

Stevenson, Philip C. ORCID: 0000-0002-0736-3619, Nyirenda, Stephen P., Mvumi, Brighton, Sola, Phosiso, Kamanula, John M., Sileshi, Gudeta and Belmain, Steven R. ORCID: 0000-0002-5590-7545 (2012) Pesticidal plants: a viable alternative insect pest management approach for resource-poor farming in Africa. In: Koul, Opender, Khokhar, Sucheta, Dhaliwal, D.S. and Singh, Ram, (eds.) Biopesticides in Environment and Food Security: Issues and Strategies. Scientific Publishers, Jodhpur, India, pp. 212-238. ISBN 9788172337971

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Abstract

Drivers behind food security and crop protection issues vis-à-vis the food losses caused by pests include rapid human population increase, climate change, loss of beneficial on-farm biodiversity, reduction in per capita cropped land, water shortages, and pesticide withdrawals. Integrated pest management, therefore, becomes a compulsory strategy in agriculture, which offers a 'toolbox' of complementary crop- and region-specific crop protection solutions to address these rising pressures. IPM aims at more sustainable solutions by using complementary technologies and one of them is the use of biopesticides including genetically modified cropping systems. The aim is to reduce pests below economic thresholds utilizing key 'ecological services', particularly biocontrol systems via semiochemicals, biopesticides, precision pest monitoring tools, and rapid diagnostics. In fact, we are facing twin problems of environment and food security for the expanding population and it is necessary to ensure adequate pesticide-free food. The ecofriendly nature of biopesticide products suggests environment protection and safety for natural enemies and non-target organisms. However, their adoption and use have lagged behind due to certain constraints like variable performance under field situations, lack of quality standards and interest by big industrial houses, and cumbersome regulatory procedures. The present book is an attempt to critically debate all these issues and suggest a road map for the future.

Item Type: Book Section
Additional Information: [1] This item is chapter 11 in the book
Uncontrolled Keywords: pesticidal plants, biopesticides, african agriculture
Subjects: Q Science > QK Botany
S Agriculture > SB Plant culture
Faculty / Department / Research Group: Faculty of Engineering & Science > Natural Resources Institute > Chemical Ecology Research Group
Faculty of Engineering & Science > Natural Resources Institute
Related URLs:
Last Modified: 26 Jul 2012 08:46
Selected for GREAT 2016: None
Selected for GREAT 2017: None
Selected for GREAT 2018: None
Selected for GREAT 2019: None
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/8594

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