Skip navigation

Prevalence of haemoparasites, leptospires and coccobacilli with potential for human infection in the blood of rodents and shrews from selected localities in Tanzania, Namibia and Swaziland

Prevalence of haemoparasites, leptospires and coccobacilli with potential for human infection in the blood of rodents and shrews from selected localities in Tanzania, Namibia and Swaziland

Katakweba, Abdul A.S., Mulungu, Loth S., Eiseb, Seth J., Mahlaba, Themb’alilahlwa A., Makundi, Rhodes H., Massawe, Apia W., Borremans, Benny and Belmain, Steven R. ORCID: 0000-0002-5590-7545 (2012) Prevalence of haemoparasites, leptospires and coccobacilli with potential for human infection in the blood of rodents and shrews from selected localities in Tanzania, Namibia and Swaziland. African Zoology, 47 (1). pp. 119-127. ISSN 1562-7020 (Print), 2224-073X (Online)

Full text not available from this repository.

Abstract

The prevalence of haemoparasites, leptospirosis and Yersinia pestis was investigated in rodents and shrews from Tanzania, Namibia and Swaziland. Blood smears originating from rodents and shrews from the three countries indicated the presence of Trypanosoma lewisi (72.7%; n =950), Bacillus spp. (25.6%; n =950), Borrelia sp. (0.01%; n =950) and bipolar coccobacilli (0.01%; n =950). The blood smears from Namibia (n =26) had no haemoparasites while only 1.33% (n =75) of those from Swaziland showed presence of T. lewisi. Leptospira interrogans was found in rodent blood sera from Tanzania in the following serogroup proportions (n =350): Icterohaemorrhagiae (10.29%), Pomona (2.86%), Hardjo (1.14%), Bullum (0.86%), Grippotyphosa (1.43%) and Canicola (1.14%). Serodiagnosis of antibodies against
the F1 antigen of Y. pestis using the enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was negative for all the serum samples from central Tanzania, while two samples of serum from two species of rodents, Rhabdomys pumilio and Gerbilliscus leucogaster, collected in the Kavango Region of Namibia were positive. These results suggest an enzootic plague activity in this region in Namibia. It is concluded that zoonotic agents, that are infectious to humans, are prevalent in rodents and shrews in the three countries, and that local communities should apply rodent control measures to reduce the risk of human infections.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: [1] Paper presented at the 4th International Conference on Rodent Biology and Management (ICRBM), 12–16 April 2010, Bloemfontein, South Africa.
Uncontrolled Keywords: haemoparasites, plague, leptospirosis, Africa, rodents
Subjects: Q Science > QL Zoology
R Medicine > RA Public aspects of medicine > RA0421 Public health. Hygiene. Preventive Medicine
Faculty / Department / Research Group: Faculty of Engineering & Science > Natural Resources Institute
Faculty of Engineering & Science > Natural Resources Institute > Agriculture, Health & Environment Department
Faculty of Engineering & Science > Natural Resources Institute > Pest Behaviour Research Group
Faculty of Engineering & Science
Related URLs:
Last Modified: 14 Jul 2015 15:16
Selected for GREAT 2016: None
Selected for GREAT 2017: None
Selected for GREAT 2018: None
Selected for GREAT 2019: None
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/8441

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item