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Effects of viewing time, fixations, and viewing strategies on visual memory for briefly presented natural objects

Effects of viewing time, fixations, and viewing strategies on visual memory for briefly presented natural objects

Huebner, Gesche M. and Gegenfurtner, Karl R. (2010) Effects of viewing time, fixations, and viewing strategies on visual memory for briefly presented natural objects. The Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, 63 (7). pp. 1398-1413. ISSN 1747-0218 (Print), 1747-0226 (Online) (doi:https://doi.org/10.1080/17470210903398139)

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Abstract

We investigated the impact of viewing time and fixations on visual memory for briefly presented natural objects. Participants saw a display of eight natural objects arranged in a circle and used a partial report procedure to assign one object to the position it previously occupied during stimulus presentation. At the longest viewing time of 7,000 ms or 10 fixations, memory performance was significantly higher than at the shorter times. This increase was accompanied by a primacy effect, suggesting a contribution of another memory component—for example, visual long-term memory (VLTM). We found a very limited beneficial effect of fixations on objects; fixated objects were only remembered better at the shortest viewing times. Our results revealed an intriguing difference between the use of a blocked versus an interleaved experimental design. When trial length was predictable, in the blocked design, target fixation durations increased with longer viewing times. When trial length was unpredictable, fixation durations stayed the same for all viewing lengths. Memory performance was not affected by this design manipulation, thus also supporting the idea that the number and duration of fixations are not closely coupled to memory performance.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: visual memory, natural objects, eye movements, fixations, interleaved versus blocked design
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
Faculty / Department / Research Group: Faculty of Architecture, Computing & Humanities
Related URLs:
Last Modified: 14 Oct 2016 09:17
Selected for GREAT 2016: None
Selected for GREAT 2017: None
Selected for GREAT 2018: None
Selected for GREAT 2019: None
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/7062

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