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Restoring humanity in healthcare through the art of compassion: an issue for the teaching and research agenda in rural Crete

Restoring humanity in healthcare through the art of compassion: an issue for the teaching and research agenda in rural Crete

Shea, S. and Lionis, C. (2010) Restoring humanity in healthcare through the art of compassion: an issue for the teaching and research agenda in rural Crete. Rural and Remote Health, 10 (4). ISSN 1445-6354

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Official URL: 1445-6354 (Electronic)

Abstract

Editorial:
Historically, the value compassion spans thousands of years, particularly in a religious context. Despite the historical usage and interpretations of the term ‘compassion’, there is still discussion on how to define it, particularly as it may encompass a number of values such as sympathy, empathy, and respect. In recent years attention has been drawn to the fact that compassion towards the patient seems to have decreased, with events at certain hospitals in the UK, Greece and elsewhere showing alarming gaps in the humanity of the care offered. Although there is limited evidence regarding the effects of compassionate care, it is thought that patients who are treated with understanding and compassion may recover faster and manage chronic disorders more effectively. Patient anxiety might also be reduced as a result of compassionate care3

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: [1] This article is numbered 1679 in volume 10, issue 4.
Uncontrolled Keywords: compassion, healthcare, rural
Pre-2014 Departments: School of Health & Social Care
Related URLs:
Last Modified: 14 Oct 2016 09:13
Selected for GREAT 2016: None
Selected for GREAT 2017: None
Selected for GREAT 2018: None
Selected for GREAT 2019: None
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/4985

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